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Highlight Not just dirt: the importance of soil
Soil is connected to almost all aspects of our lives, yet we often take it for granted. To mark the International Day of Soil on December 5, we interviewed several project managers at the European Environment Agency (EEA) about this precious resource.
Located in News
Figure Pascal source code Soil quality index map
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Changes in soil organic carbon content across England and Wales between 1978 and 2003
The map shows the difference in soil organic carbon content
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data Soil type
Corine European soil database version 2
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Indicator Assessment Progress in management of contaminated sites
Soil contamination requiring clean up is present at approximately 250000 sites in the EEA member countries, according to recent estimates. And this number is expected to grow. Potentially polluting activities are estimated to have occurred at nearly 3 million sites (including the 250000 sites already mentioned) and investigation is needed to establish whether remediation is required. If current investigation trends continue, the number of sites needing remediation will increase by 50% by 2025. By contrast, more than 80000 sites have been cleaned up in the last 30 years in the countries where data on remediation is available. Although the range of polluting activities (and their relative importance as localised sources of soil contamination) may vary considerably across Europe, industrial and commercial activities as well as the treatment and disposal of waste are reported to be the most important sources. National reports indicate that heavy metals and mineral oil are the most frequent soil contaminants at investigated sites, while mineral oil and chlorinated hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants found in groundwater. A considerable share of remediation expenditure, about 35% on average, comes from public budgets. Although considerable efforts have been made already, it will take decades to clean up a legacy of contamination.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Progress in management of contaminated sites
Figure Pascal source code Sensitivity to desertification index map
Map from the DISMED project (Desertification Information System for the Mediterranean) showing the sensitivity to desertification and drought as defined by the sensitivity to desertification index (SDI) based on soil quality, climate and vegetation parameters.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure OpenDocument Spreadsheet Template Regional coincidence of some environmental pressures and impacts (hot spots)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Video What is soil?
Soil is connected to almost all aspects of our lives, yet we often take it for granted. To mark the International Day of Soil on December 5, we interviewed several project managers at the European Environment Agency (EEA) about this precious resource.
Located in Media Audiovisuals
Figure Estimated soil erosion by water in Europe
Calculated by the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). While the overall patterns of erosion are generally sound, the validation of erosion data can be challenging. The data presented are currently being validated through comparisons with national datasets and expert judgement. In this sense, zooming in on a specific locality can give the impression of a situation that differs from reality. In addition, the model used in this exercise does not consider localised intense precipitation.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Estimated nitrogen surplus across Europe, 2005
Estimated nitrogen surplus (the difference between inorganic and organic fertilizer application, atmospheric deposition, fixation and uptake by crops) for the year 2005 across Europe.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100