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Press Release Industrial air pollution cost Europe up to €169 billion in 2009, EEA reveals
Air pollution from the 10,000 largest polluting facilities in Europe cost citizens between € 102 and 169 billion in 2009. This was one of the findings of a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA) which analysed the costs of harm to health and the environment caused by air pollution. Half of the total damage cost (between € 51 and 85 billion) was caused by just 191 facilities.
Located in Media News
Publication Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe
This European Environment Agency (EEA) report assesses the damage costs to health and the environment resulting from pollutants emitted from industrial facilities. It is based on the latest information, namely for 2009, publicly available through the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR, 2011) in line with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Aarhus Convention regarding access to environmental information.
Located in Publications
Publication Troff document Laying the foundations for greener transport — TERM 2011: transport indicators tracking progress towards environmental targets in Europe
For the first time ever the European Commissions is proposing a greenhouse gas emissions target for transport. But how is transport going to provide the services that our society needs while minimising its environmental impacts? This is the theme for the Transport White Paper launched in 2011. TERM 2011 and future reports aim to deliver an annual assessment on progress towards these targets by introducing the Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism Core Set of Indicators (TERM-CSI). TERM 2011 provides also the baseline to which progress will be checked against, covering most of the environmental areas, including energy consumption, emissions, noise and transport demand. In addition, this report shows latest data and discuss on the different aspects that can contribute the most to minimise transport impacts. TERM 2011 applies the avoid-shift-improve (ASI) approach, introduced in the previous TERM report, analysing ways to optimise transport demand, obtain a more sustainable modal split or use the best technology available.
Located in Publications
Press Release European transport sector must be ambitious to meet targets
Emissions of many pollutants from transport fell in 2009. But this reduction may only be a temporary effect of the economic downturn, according to the latest annual report on transport emissions from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism (TERM) explores the environmental impact of transport. For the first time, the report considers a comprehensive set of quantitative targets proposed by the European Commission’s 2011 roadmap on transport.
Located in Media News
Figure NO2 (top) and PM10 (bottom) concentration trends at urban background (left) and traffic (right) locations
Top: NO2 concentration in selected cities from 2002 to 2009. Bottom: PM10 concentrations in selected cities from 1999 to 2009. Values are presented for single monitoring stations that provide reliable time series data for the last years. Selected cities have at least one background and one traffic station that provide such reliability and can therefore be compared for analysis. Therefore, this figure does not represent air quality results citywide, but rather serves as a snapshot of the different trends in background and traffic stations wherever comparable long-term time-series data are available. Because the different lines represent individual measurement points, there can be a significant effect from local changes in traffic flows. According to sources, this is part of the background for the large change in the NO2 levels in London.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Annual mean NO2 concentration observed at traffic stations, 2009 - Annual mean PM10 concentration observed at traffic stations, 2009
The two highest NO2 concentration classes (red and orange) correspond to the 2010 annual LV (40 μg/m3) and to the LV plus margin of tolerance (42 μg/m3). The two highest PM10 concentration classes (red and orange) correspond to the 2005 annual LV (40 μg/m3), and to a statistically derived level (31 μg/m3) corresponding to the 2005 daily LV. The lowest class corresponds to the WHO air quality guideline for PM10 of 20 μg/m3.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Particulate matter (PM10) - Annual limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set two limit values for particulate matter (PM10) for the protection of human health: the PM10 daily mean value may not exceed 50 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 35 times in a year and the PM10 annual mean value may not exceed 40 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3). In some areas time extensions have been granted by DG Environment for meeting these limit values. Information about time extensions is provided by DG Environment at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/air/quality/legislation/time_extensions.htm
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Particulate matter (PM10) - Daily limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set two limit values for particulate matter (PM10) for the protection of human health: the PM10 daily mean value may not exceed 50 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 35 times in a year and the PM10 annual mean value may not exceed 40 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3). In some areas time extensions have been granted by DG Environment for meeting these limit values. Information about time extensions is provided by DG Environment at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/air/quality/legislation/time_extensions.htm
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Contribution of different sectors (energy and non-energy) to total emissions of PM10 and PM2.5, 2008, EEA-32
The graph includes the combined emissions of primary PM10 particles (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 μm or less, emitted directly into the atmosphere).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Changes (%) in energy related emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 by source category, 1990-2008, EEA-32
‘Energy combustion’ includes all energy-related emissions minus fugitives the graph shows the emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 μm or less, emitted directly into the atmosphere)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100