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Highlight Homes responsible for one quarter of European greenhouse emissions from energy
Home energy use is responsible overall for 25 % of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union (EU), according to a new analysis from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report calculates emissions based on their 'end use', or the sector using the energy. Homes in the EU only emit 12 % of energy emissions directly, but this doubles when related emissions from power plants and district heating are factored in.
Located in News
Figure Final energy consumption in EU industry, 1990–2008
GHG emissions resulting from the consumption of electrical energy and derived heat, do not count towards direct emissions of the industry, but are accounted in the sector 1A1 'Energy supply'.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Troff document Laying the foundations for greener transport — TERM 2011: transport indicators tracking progress towards environmental targets in Europe
For the first time ever the European Commissions is proposing a greenhouse gas emissions target for transport. But how is transport going to provide the services that our society needs while minimising its environmental impacts? This is the theme for the Transport White Paper launched in 2011. TERM 2011 and future reports aim to deliver an annual assessment on progress towards these targets by introducing the Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism Core Set of Indicators (TERM-CSI). TERM 2011 provides also the baseline to which progress will be checked against, covering most of the environmental areas, including energy consumption, emissions, noise and transport demand. In addition, this report shows latest data and discuss on the different aspects that can contribute the most to minimise transport impacts. TERM 2011 applies the avoid-shift-improve (ASI) approach, introduced in the previous TERM report, analysing ways to optimise transport demand, obtain a more sustainable modal split or use the best technology available.
Located in Publications
Press Release European transport sector must be ambitious to meet targets
Emissions of many pollutants from transport fell in 2009. But this reduction may only be a temporary effect of the economic downturn, according to the latest annual report on transport emissions from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism (TERM) explores the environmental impact of transport. For the first time, the report considers a comprehensive set of quantitative targets proposed by the European Commission’s 2011 roadmap on transport.
Located in Media News
Indicator Assessment Final energy consumption intensity (ENER 021) - Assessment published Aug 2011
Economic growth continues to entail less final energy consumption within the EU-27 economy. Over the period 1990-2008, the EU final energy intensity has decreased by around 1.6%/year, and mainly during the years 1996-2000 (-3.1%/year). Since 1995, decoupling of growth from final energy consumption was most successful in the agriculture and services sector where the energy intensity has decreased by respectively 25.7% and 24.9%. In the tertiary and transport sectors the final energy consumption intensities have decreased by 15 % and 8% compared to 1995. In the households sector, the final energy consumption per capita increased by 1.9 % since 1995 due to larger and more numerous dwellings, and greater ownership of electrical appliances.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Final energy consumption intensity
Indicator Assessment Renewable gross final energy consumption (ENER 028) - Assessment published Aug 2011
In 2008, the share of renewable energy in final gross energy consumption (with normalised hydro and wind) [1] in the EU-27 was 10.4 % (up from 6% in 1990, 7.6 % in 2000), representing half of the 20 % target set in the EU directive on renewable energy for 2020. Renewable energies represented in 2008, 11.8% of total final heat consumption (up from 6.3% in 1990, 9% in 2000), 17% of electricity consumption (up from 12% in 1990, 13.8% in 2000) and 3.4% of transport fuels consumption (up from 0.02% in 1993) [2] [1] Gross final consumption of energy is defined in Directive 2009/28/EC on renewable sources as energy commodities delivered for energy purposes to final consumers (industry, transport, households, services, agriculture, forestry and fisheries), including the consumption of electricity and heat by the energy branch for electricity and heat production and including losses of electricity and heat in distribution and transmission. [2] The gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources is calculated as the sum of: (a) gross final consumption of electricity from renewable energy sources; (b) gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources for heating and cooling; and (c) final consumption of energy from renewable sources in transport.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Renewable gross final energy consumption
Figure Variation of final energy intensity in EU and EEA countries, 1990-2008
The figure shows the variation of final energy intensity (the ratio between the final energy consumption and the GDP) in EU and EEA countries
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Renewable primary energy consumption (CSI 030/ENER 029) - Assessment published Aug 2011
The share of renewable energy sources in gross inland energy consumption (GEIC) increased in the EU-27 from 4.4% in 1990 to 8.4% in 2008. The main contributor is biomass and wastes (5.8% of the GEIC), following by hydro (1.6%) and wind (0.6%). Because the gross inland energy consumption of the EU-27 increased by 8.3% between 1990 and 2008, some of the environmental benefits (e.g. reductions in GHG emissions and air pollution) brought about by an increased share of renewable energy sources were offset. In 2008, the share of renewable energy in total gross inland consumption in EU-15 was 8.6%, hence a significant effort will be needed to meet the indicative target of 12 % share of renewables by 2010.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Renewable primary energy consumption
Indicator Assessment Total primary energy intensity (CSI 028/ENER 017) - Assessment published Aug 2011
Between 1990 and 2007, economic growth in Europe required increasing but less and less energy inputs. Total energy consumption increased until 2004 and stabilized all the way through 2006. In 2008 there was an absolute decoupling of economic growth and energy consumption, with the latter decreasing by 0.5% compared to 2007 while GDP continued to grow.  Over the period 1990-2008, GDP grew at an annual average rate of 2.1% and total energy consumption at an annual average rate of 0.4%. As a result, total energy intensity in the EU fell at an annual average rate of 1.6%
Located in Data and maps Indicators Total primary energy intensity
Indicator Assessment Final energy consumption by sector (CSI 027/ENER 016) - Assessment published Aug 2011
Between 1990 and 2008, the final energy consumption in the EU-27 increased by 9.7 % at an annual average rate of 0.5%. Transport remains the sector with the fastest growing energy consumption (33.7% over the period) followed by services (29.0% over the period). Over the same period, household final energy consumption increased by about 13.0% while final consumption in industry fell by 13.0 %. Between 2007 and 2008, EU-27 final energy consumption increased by 0.3 % mainly due to significant increase in the services (5.2 %) and households (4.3%) sectors. In transport and industry final energy consumption actually decreased between 2007 and 2008 by 0.7% and 3.8% respectively. On average, one person in the EEA counties used 2.2 tonnes of oil equivalent to meet their energy needs in 2008.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Final energy consumption by sector
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