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Indicator Assessment Nutrients in freshwater (CSI 020) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2012
•    Average nitrate concentrations in European groundwaters increased from 1992 to 1998, but have declined again since 2004. •    The average nitrate concentration in European rivers decreased by approximately 13% between 1992 and 2009 (from 2.5 to 2.1 mg/l N), reflecting the effect of measures to reduce agricultural inputs of nitrate. •    Average orthophosphate concentrations in European rivers have decreased markedly over the last two decades, being halved between 1992 and 2009 (52% decrease). Also average lake phosphorus concentration decreased over the period 1992-2009 (by 22%), the major part of the decrease occurring in the first half of the period. The decrease in phosphorus concentrations reflects both improvement in wastewater treatment and reduction in phosphorus in detergents. •    Overall, reductions in the levels of freshwater nutrients over the last two decades primarily reflect improvements in wastewater treatment. Emissions from agriculture continue to be a significant source.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Nutrients in freshwater
Figure Inland bathing water quality in the European Union, 1990-2010
The figure shows the bathing water quality in different European countries over time 1990, 7 EU Member States; 1991 to 1994, 12 EU Member States; 1995-96, 14 EU Member States; 1997 to 2003, 15 EU Member States; 2004, 21 EU Member States; 2005-06, 25 EU Member States; 2007 to 2010, 27 EU Member States. No inland bathing waters are reported from three Member States (Cyprus, Malta and Romania). The quality classes under the New Bathing Water Directive (2006/7/EC) for Hungary and Luxembourg are jointed with compliance categories under the Bathing Water Directive (76/160/EEC)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Bathing water quality (CSI 022) - Assessment published Mar 2012
The quality of water at designated bathing waters in Europe (coastal and inland) has improved significantly since 1990. Compliance with mandatory values in EU coastal bathing waters increased from just below 80 % in 1990 to 92.1 % in 2010. Compliance with guide values likewise rose from over 68 % to 79.5 % in 2010. Compliance with mandatory values in EU inland bathing waters increased from 52 % in 1990 to 90.2 % in 2010. Similarly, the rate of compliance with guide values moved from 36.4 % in 1990 to 60.5 % in 2010.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Bathing water quality
Figure Phosphorus concentrations in lakes (total phosphorus) between 1992 and 2009 in different geographical regions of Europe.
The data series per region are calculated as the average of the annual mean for lake monitoring stations in the region. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). There were no stations with complete series after inter/extrapolation in the South and Southeast regions. The number of lake monitoring stations included per geographical region is given in parentheses
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Phosphorus concentrations in rivers (orthophosphate) between 1992 and 2009 in different sea regions of Europe
The sea region data series are calculated as the average of annual mean data from river monitoring stations in each sea region. The data thus represents rivers or river basins draining into that particular sea. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). The number of river monitoring stations per region is given in parentheses.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure BOD5 concentrations in rivers between 1992 and 2009 draining to different sea regions of Europe
Geographical coverage: Baltic Sea, Black Sea, Celtic Seas, Bay of Biscay, Iberian Cost, Greater North Sea, Mediterranean Sea.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Emissions of acidifying substances (CSI 001/APE 007) - Assessment published Dec 2011
Emissions of the acidifying pollutants (nitrogen oxides (NO X ), sulphur oxides (SO X ) and ammonia (NH 3 ) have decreased significantly in most of the individual EEA member countries between 1990 and 2009. Emissions of SO X have decreased by 76%, NO X by 41% and NH 3 emissions by 26% since 1990. The EU-27 is on track to meet its overall target to reduce emissions of SO X and NH 3 as specified by the EU’s National Emissions Ceiling Directive (NECD). However a number of individual Member States, and the EU as a whole, anticipates missing their NECD 2010 emission ceilings for NO X . Of the three non-EU countries having emission ceilings for 2010 under the UNECE/CLRTAP Gothenburg protocol (Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), both Liechtenstein and Norway reported NO X emissions in 2009 that were substantially higher than their respective 2010 ceilings.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Emissions of acidifying substances
Indicator Assessment Emissions of ozone precursors (CSI 002/APE 008) - Assessment published Dec 2011
Emissions of the main ground-level ozone precursor pollutants have decreased across the EEA-32 region between 1990 and 2009; nitrogen oxides (NO X ) by 41%, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) by 51%, carbon monoxide (CO) by 61%, and methane (CH 4 ) by 27%. This decrease has been achieved mainly as a result of the introduction of catalytic converters for vehicles. These changes have significantly reduced emissions of NO X and CO from the road transport sector, the main source of ozone precursor emissions. The EU-27 is still some way from meeting its 2010 target to reduce emissions of NO X , one of the two ozone precursors (NO X and NMVOC) for which emission limits exist under the EU’s National Emissions Ceiling Directive (NECD). Whilst total NMVOC emissions in the EU-27 were below the NECD limit in 2009, a number of individual Member States anticipate missing their ceilings for one or either of these two pollutants. Of the three non-EU countries having emission ceilings for 2010 set under the UNECE/CLRTAP Gothenburg protocol (Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), all three countries reported NMVOC emissions in 2009 that were lower than their respective 2010 ceilings. However both Liechtenstein and Norway reported NO X emissions in 2009 that were substantially higher than their respective 2010 ceilings.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Emissions of ozone precursors
Indicator Assessment Production and consumption of ozone depleting substances (CSI 006) - Assessment published Dec 2011
The total production and consumption of ozone depleting substances in EEA member countries has decreased significantly since the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987, nowadays it is practically zero. Globally, the implementation of the Montreal Protocol has led to a decrease in the atmospheric burden of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the lower atmosphere and in the stratosphere. Many ODSs are also potent greenhouse gases. The phasing out of ODS under the Montreal Protocol has reduced global greenhouse gas emissions by an amount 5 to 6 times larger than the UNFCCC's Kyoto Protocol target for the first commitment period, 2008-2012.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Production and consumption of ozone depleting substances
Indicator Assessment Municipal waste generation (CSI 016/WST 001) - Assessment published Dec 2011
One of the most important objectives of the EU policy is to decouple waste generation from economic growth. Data shows that Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generation in the EU-27 has been stabilising after around 520 kg/capita since 2000, despite the continuous economic growth until 2008. The effect of the recent economic crisis can be a reason of the further reductions in 2008-2009.  
Located in Data and maps Indicators Municipal waste generation
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