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Highlight Blue-green algae - check the water before you swim
Most beaches, lakes and rivers in Europe were clean and healthy last year. But water quality can be affected by many unforeseen factors, including sewage, agricultural waste and algae. The European Environment Agency (EEA) recommends checking local water quality information before you jump in.
Located in News
Press Release Europe’s bathing waters continue to improve
Ninety-four per cent of bathing sites in the European Union meet minimum standards for water quality, according to the European Environment Agency's annual report on bathing water quality in Europe. Water quality is excellent at 78 % of sites and almost 2 % more sites meet the minimum requirements compared to last year's report.
Located in Media News
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Impacts and pressures (WFD 001) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2013
The pressures reported to affect most surface water bodies are pollution from diffuse sources causing nutrient enrichment, and hydromorphological pressures causing altered habitats. Lakes are generally least affected by pressures and their impacts. Pollution from diffuse sources is reported for a larger proportion of water bodies than pollution from point sources for all water categories except transitional waters. The highest proportion of water bodies affected by hydromorphological pressures and altered habitats impact is found for rivers. 
Located in Data and maps Indicators Impacts and pressures
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Chemical status (WFD 002) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2013
This indicator summarises the results from the Water Framework (WFD) River  Basin Management Plans (RBMP) on chemical status of groundwater and surface waters. The results should be interpreted cautiously, since chemical monitoring as reported in the first RBMPs was incomplete, and information is not always comparable between Member States.  The results from the first showed: Poor chemical status for groundwater, by area, is about 25 % across Europe. A total of 16 Member States have more than 10 % of groundwater bodies in poor chemical status; this figure exceeds 50 % in four Member States. Excessive levels of nitrate are the most frequent cause of poor groundwater status across much of Europe.   Poor chemical status for rivers, lakes, and transitional and coastal waters does not exceed 10 %, aggregated across Europe as a whole. Notably, the chemical status of many of Europe’s surface waters remains unknown, ranging between one third of lakes and more than half of transitional waters. A total of 10 Member States report poor chemical status in more than 20 % of rivers and lakes with known chemical status, whilst this figure rises to above 40 % in five Member States. A total of 10 Member States report poor chemical status in more than 20 % of rivers and lakes with known chemical status, whilst this figure rises to above 40 % in five Member States.   Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a widespread cause of poor status in rivers. Heavy metals are also a significant contributor to poor status in rivers and lakes, with levels of mercury in Swedish freshwater biota causing 100 % failure to reach good chemical status. Industrial chemicals such as the plasticiser di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and pesticides also constitute widespread causes of poor chemical status in rivers.  Six Member States report poor chemical status in transitional waters to be more than 50 % of the water bodies with known chemical status. PAHs, the antifouling biocide tributyltin (TBT) and heavy metals are the most common culprits.  Six Member States report all their coastal waters as having good chemical status, although in five others, poor chemical status exceeds 90 % of those water bodies with a known chemical status. A variety of pollutant groups contribute to poor status in coastal waters, reflecting a diverse range of sources.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Chemical status
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Ecological status or potential (WFD 003) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2013
More than half of the surface water bodies in Europe are reported to be in less than good ecological status or potential, and will need mitigation and/or restoration measures to meet the WFD objective.  River water bodies and transitional waters are reported to have worse ecological status or potential than water bodies in lakes and coastal waters.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Ecological status or potential
GIS Map Application Biological elements in rivers and lakes
This viewer with 4 maps shows the ecological status (i.e. status or potential) of macroinvertebrates and phytobenthos in European rivers (i.e. rivers and canals) potentially impacted by general degradation and of macrophytes and phytobenthos in European lakes (i.e. lakes and reservoirs) potentially impacted by eutrophication, respectively. The ecological status class of a country's waterbodies (or stations) is assessed by each country according to their national classification system, following the Water Framework Directive. The assessment may be based by one or more samples measured during the year of reporting. The ecological status in rivers or lakes is displayed as classified cartograms in a country-level map: it displays the distribution of status classes per country as one pie chart for each country. This can be used to compare the situation in your country with that in other countries. When the map is zoomed in to a more detailed scale individual station points are visible instead of classified cartograms.
Located in Environmental topics Water Interactive maps and data viewers by category
Figure D source code Conservation status of river and lake habitat types and species, and conservation status of coastal and transitional waters habitat types of European interest
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Chemical status of rivers and lakes per RBD — percentage of water bodies not achieving good chemical status
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Chemical status of rivers and lakes
The graphs illustrate the chemical status of river and lake water bodies as percentage of water bodies in poor and good chemical status, by count of water bodies.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Distribution of chemical status of groundwater, rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal waters.
Number of Member States contributing to the dataset: Groundwater (26); Rivers (25); Lakes (22); Transitional (15) and Coastal (20). Percentages shown for rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal are by water body count. Groundwater percentages, however, are expressed by area. The total number of water bodies is shown in parenthesis. Data from Sweden are excluded from surface water data illustrated in the figure. This is because Sweden contributed a disproportionately large amount of data and, classified all its surface waters as poor status since levels of mercury found within biota in both fresh and coastal waters exceed quality standards.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100