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Figure Top-down decomposition analysis of total GHG emission trends in the EU, 1990–2008
Each bar shows the contribution of a single driver on GHG emission trends during a determined period. The thick short black lines indicate the combined effect of all emission drivers, i.e. the overall GHG emission trend during the period considered.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Press Release Industrial air pollution cost Europe up to €169 billion in 2009, EEA reveals
Air pollution from the 10,000 largest polluting facilities in Europe cost citizens between € 102 and 169 billion in 2009. This was one of the findings of a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA) which analysed the costs of harm to health and the environment caused by air pollution. Half of the total damage cost (between € 51 and 85 billion) was caused by just 191 facilities.
Located in Media News
Publication Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe
This European Environment Agency (EEA) report assesses the damage costs to health and the environment resulting from pollutants emitted from industrial facilities. It is based on the latest information, namely for 2009, publicly available through the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR, 2011) in line with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Aarhus Convention regarding access to environmental information.
Located in Publications
Highlight D source code Carbon capture and storage could also impact air pollution
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing carbon dioxide released by power stations and other industrial sources, and burying it deep underground. But in addition to keeping an important greenhouse gas (GHG) out of the atmosphere, this technology will lead to benefits and trade-offs for air pollution. A new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA) describes the effects that CCS may have on emissions of some key air pollutants.
Located in News
Publication Air pollution impacts from carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) consists of the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plants and/or CO2-intensive industries such as refineries, cement, iron and steel, its subsequent transport to a storage site, and finally its injection into a suitable underground geological formation for the purposes of permanent storage. It is considered to be one of the medium term 'bridging technologies' in the portfolio of available mitigation actions for stabilising concentrations of atmospheric CO2, the main greenhouse gas (GHG).
Located in Publications
Publication Troff document Laying the foundations for greener transport — TERM 2011: transport indicators tracking progress towards environmental targets in Europe
For the first time ever the European Commissions is proposing a greenhouse gas emissions target for transport. But how is transport going to provide the services that our society needs while minimising its environmental impacts? This is the theme for the Transport White Paper launched in 2011. TERM 2011 and future reports aim to deliver an annual assessment on progress towards these targets by introducing the Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism Core Set of Indicators (TERM-CSI). TERM 2011 provides also the baseline to which progress will be checked against, covering most of the environmental areas, including energy consumption, emissions, noise and transport demand. In addition, this report shows latest data and discuss on the different aspects that can contribute the most to minimise transport impacts. TERM 2011 applies the avoid-shift-improve (ASI) approach, introduced in the previous TERM report, analysing ways to optimise transport demand, obtain a more sustainable modal split or use the best technology available.
Located in Publications
Figure Evolution of CO2 emissions from new passenger cars by fuel type
Graph showing progression of average emissions for new cars versus 2015 and 2020 targets
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Estimated specific emissions of CO2 by mode of transport (EEA-30)
Bar chart shows estimated specific emissions of CO2 for passenger and freight transport modes in 1995 and 2010
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Average emissions for new cars (gCO2/km) (EU-27)
Graph showing progression of average emissions for new cars versus 2015 and 2020 targets
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Big potential of cutting greenhouse gases from waste
There is a big potential to cut greenhouse gases (GHGs) from municipal solid waste management, according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report, 'Waste opportunities – Past and future climate benefits from better municipal waste management in Europe', covers the EU-27 (excluding Cyprus), Norway and Switzerland. It estimates that these countries could make GHG savings of up to 78 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) by 2020, or 1.53 % of Europe's emissions in 2008.
Located in News
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100