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File Better and cleaner urban transport for Europe
Urban traffic is responsible for 40% of CO2 road transport emissions. In Europe, 9 citizens out of 10 are exposed to harmful particle emissions that are higher than the tolerated norm. Time wasted in traffic jams will soon cost 1% of the European Union’s GDP. In terms of urban transport, the European Union contributes to financing infrastructures and equipment, but also supports projects aiming at replacing petrol by alternative and clean fuels. Most cities in the EU are putting in place a mix of advanced technologies and transport policy measures, such as alternative traffic management systems to combine mobility and quality of life. The EU cooperates with cities, notably through the CIVITAS network, to favour the exchange of know-how and best practices at European level.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
Publication Success stories within the road transport sector on reducing greenhouse gas emission and producing ancillary benefits
Located in Publications
Publication Climate for a transport change. TERM 2007: indicators tracking transport and environment in the European Union
Located in Publications
File Giving Europe more breathing space
Air pollution has been one of Europe’s main concerns since the late 1970s. Over the last few decades, the rapid growth in industry and increased reliance on cars and public transport has contributed to a rapid decline in air quality, from smog and acid rain to asthma and other respiratory diseases.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Multimedia
File The fourth assessment: Presentation of the report at the Belgrade conference
Subtitled movie of the speech hold by Executive Director of the EEA Jacqueline McGlade during the presentation of the 4th pan-European assessment at the UNECE 6th Мinisterial Conference "Environment for Europe", in Belgrade, 10th of October 2007.
Located in Environmental topics Archive: the Belgrade ministerial conference Videos and interviews
Publication Transport and environment: on the way to a new common transport policy
Located in Publications
Publication Annual European Community LRTAP Convention Emission Inventory 1990-2004
Located in Publications
Publication Transport and environment: facing a dilemma - TERM 2005
Indicators tracking transport and environment in the European Union
Located in Publications
Publication Air pollution at street level in European cities
Located in Publications
File C source code header Air quality and health
(Transcription of audio on video) Europe loses 200 million working days a year to air pollution-related illness. The air pollutants that affect the respiratory system are ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, and particulate matter. The breathing in of fine particulate matter significantly increases the numbers of deaths from cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary diseases. Over a third of particulate matter comes from domestic wood stoves, another third from industrial sources, and the remainder from transport and agriculture. Ground level ozone, one of the components of smog and produced through vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions, also has severe implications for respiratory health. The European Commission Clean Air for Europe programme found that in the year 2000 around 350,000 people were dying prematurely due to outdoor pollution of fine particulate matter alone. Although levels of particulate matter and ozone have both been reducing in recent decades, estimates indicate that 20 million Europeans suffer from respiratory problems. Source: The European environment - State and outlook 2005
Located in Environmental topics Environment and health Multimedia
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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