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Indicator Assessment Fishing fleet capacity (CSI 034) - Assessment published Feb 2009
The EFTA fleet increased slightly in terms of power (~ 3%) and decreased slightly in tonnage (~ 2%) but the number of vessels decreased by 40%. The slight decrease in tonnage in the EFTA countries for this period is preceded by an increase so given the whole period 1989-2006 there has been a 25 % increase in tonnage in the EFTA countries. The most recent new member countries Bulgaria and Romania showed a decrease in tonnage (69%) and number of vessels (56 %) in the period 1989-1995. The size of the EU fishing fleet is following a downward trend, with reductions in power (17%), tonnage (12%) and numbers (20%) in the period 1998-2006. In EU-15 and EFTA countries the average size of vessels has increased by 11% and 65% respectively, in EU-7 countries and Romania and Bulgaria the average size has decreased by 76% and 29%. Similarly, the combined fleet of the EU-7countries decreased its tonnage by 68 % over 1995-2006 but at the same time their number of vessels increased substantially (by 34%). 
Located in Data and maps Indicators Fishing fleet capacity
Indicator Assessment Fishing fleet capacity (CSI 034) - Assessment published Sep 2011
The overall size and capacity (power and tonnage) of the European fishing fleets continues to follow a downward trend in all countries groups – EU15, EFTA, EU7, and Bulgaria and Romania. There are still however important issues concerning data availability and quality that need to be overcome to allow for a more robust assessment, especially for the Member States who have most recently joined the EU. The average size of vessels seems to be increasing in EU15 and EFTA, whereas in EU7 and in Bulgaria and Romania there seems to be a downward trend. The increase in the average size of vessels in the main European fishing fleets, i.e. EU15 and EFTA, possibly indicates a shift towards trawlers and purse seines, which are usually larger than vessels using passive gear and hence exert a greater fishing pressure. Also, other parameters such as technological developments, type of fishing gear and level of activity should be included in the analysis of fleet capacity to more accurately assess the effective fishing capacity of the European fishing fleet.  
Located in Data and maps Indicators Fishing fleet capacity
Figure Fishing mortality of Northeast Arctic cod stocks
This figure shows fishing mortality of Northeast Arctic cod stocks between 1946 and 2005
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010: proposal for a first set of indicators to monitor progress in Europe
Located in Publications
Figure application/x-troff-ms Landings of main commercial species in European Large Marine Ecosystems
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Late lessons from early warnings: the precautionary principle 1896-2000
Late lessons from early warnings is about the gathering of information on the hazards of human economic activities and its use in taking action to better protect both the environment and the health of the species and ecosystems that are dependent on it, and then living with the consequences. The report is based on case studies. The authors of the case studies, all experts in their particular field of environmental, occupational and consumer hazards, were asked to identify the dates of early warnings, to analyse how this information was used, or not used, in reducing hazards, and to describe the resulting costs, benefits and lessons for the future.
Located in Publications
Article Marine — biodiversity under pressure
Located in Signals — every breath we take Signals 2010
SOER Key fact Marine and coastal environment - key fact 2
The consumption of fish in Europe has been increasing over the last 15 years while fish catches from European waters have decreased.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key facts
Publication chemical/x-pdb Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
European marine regions include the north-east Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and the Mediterranean, Black and Baltic seas. Human activities — such as fishing, aquaculture and agriculture — and climate change cause large and severe impacts on Europe's coastal and marine ecosystems. The EU objective of halting biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met in either the coastal or the marine environment. Recognising the need for an integrated ecosystem-based approach to reduce pressures, the EU Integrated Maritime Policy allows for the development of sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. Its environmental pillar, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, aims to deliver 'good environmental status' of the marine environment by 2020, and the Common Fisheries Policy will be reformed in 2012 with the aim of achieving sustainable fisheries. Complementary policy efforts include the EU Water Framework Directive and other freshwater legislation, and the Habitats and Birds Directives.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Marine and coastal environment — key message 3
Unsustainable fishing occurs in all European Seas and is threatening the viability of European fish stocks. 21 to 60% of the commercial fish stocks in the North-East Atlantic, the Baltic Sea and the Mediterranean are considered to be outside safe biological limits.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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