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Highlight Increasing fragmentation of landscape threatens European wildlife
Roads, motorways, railways, intensive agriculture and urban developments are breaking up Europe’s landscapes into ever-smaller pieces, with potentially devastating consequences for flora and fauna across the continent, according to a new joint report from the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). The report, 'Landscape fragmentation in Europe', demonstrates how areas of land are often unable to support high levels of biodiversity when they are split into smaller and smaller parcels.
Located in News
Figure Intensity of urban sprawl 2000–2006 in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania (above) and Ireland (below)
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Land cover 2006 and changes country analysis
Based on common template, EEA has analyzed the Corine Land cover 2006 data and provides graphs and maps with concise characterization of land cover changes in 38 EEA member and collaborating countries. Provided information does not represent reporting from the Countries, however it is based on validated CLC2006 data.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Land cover distribution in Europe in 2000 and 2050
Land cover distribution in Europe in 2000 and 2050
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Land in Europe: prices, taxes and use patterns
Developments in land‑use patterns across Europe are generating considerable concern, particularly in relation to achievement of environmental goals. Land‑use trends — such as urban sprawl and land abandonment — are jeopardising the future for sustainable land use. Moreover, these trends endanger the achievement of European environmental goals in areas such as biodiversity protection and water management and also hinder the effectiveness of instruments in these areas, including the Natura 2000 network and the Water Framework Directive.
Located in Publications
Indicator Assessment chemical/x-pdb Land take (CSI 014/LSI 001) - Assessment published Feb 2011
Land take by the expansion of residential areas and construction sites is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of urban land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them. The annual land take in 36 European countries was 111 788 ha/year in 2000-2006. In 21 countries covered by both periods (1990-2000 and 2000-2006) the annual land take increased by 9 % in the later period. The composition of land taken areas changed, too. More arable land and permanent crops, forests, grasslands and open spaces and less pastures and mosaic farmland were taken by artificial development then in 1990-2000. 
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
Indicator Assessment Land take (CSI 014/LSI 001) - Assessment published Jun 2013
Land take by the expansion of residential areas and construction sites is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of urban land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them. The annual land take in European countries assessed by 2006 Corine land cover project (EEA39 except Greece) was approximately 108 000 ha/year in 2000-2006. In 21 countries covered by both periods (1990-2000 and 2000-2006) the annual land take decreased by 9 % in the later period. The composition of land taken areas changed, too. More arable land and permanent crops and less pastures and mosaic farmland were taken by artificial development then in 1990-2000. Identified trends are expected to change little when next assessment for 2006-2012 becomes available in 2014.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
Land use
Europe is one of the most intensively used continents on the globe, with the highest share of land (up to 80%) used for settlement, production systems (including agriculture and forestry) and infrastructure. Conflicting land-use demands often arise, requiring decisions that will involve hard trade-offs. There are several important drivers for land use in Europe: the increasing demand for living space per person and the link between economic activity, increased mobility and growth of transport infrastructure usually result in land take. Land is a finite resource: how it is used constitutes one of the principal reasons for environmental change, with significant impacts on quality of life and ecosystems, as well as on the management of infrastructure.
Located in Environmental topics Land use
Common environmental theme Octet Stream Land use - Drivers and pressures (Croatia)
SOER Common environmental theme from Croatia
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Country assessments Croatia
Common environmental theme Land use - Drivers and pressures (Germany)
SOER Common environmental theme from Germany
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Country assessments Germany
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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