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Sound and independent information
on the environment

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Article Forests, health and climate change
Forests are essential to our survival and well-being. Forests clean our air, our water, our soil and they regulate our climate, amongst many other things. Trees and forests are not always associated with urban landscapes. However, there too they provide invaluable, often invisible, services. Simply by acting as 'green oasis' in our concrete jungles, they offer recreation and health services for many European citizens.
Located in Articles
Figure C source code header Frequency distribution of concentrations in excess of the long-term objective for the protection of human health.
Presented as Box-Jenkins plots indicating the minimum, the 25th percentile, the 75th percentile and the maximum value
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Folder D source code Global megatrends
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010
Publication Good practice guide on noise exposure and potential health effects
This guide is intended to assist policy makers and competent authorities in understanding and fulfilling the action planning requirements of Directive 2002/49/EC
Located in Publications
Highlight Has policy improved Europe's air quality?
In recent decades, the EU has introduced a range of policies to improve air quality by controlling pollutant emissions. A new report by the European Environment Agency (EEA) evaluates three key instruments and finds that they have significantly improved Europe's air quality and reduced pollution-induced health effects. There is scope for even more progress, however, if countries achieve all their binding commitments to reduce emissions.
Located in News
Highlight text/x-sh Hazardous substances in Europe’s fresh and marine waters – an overview
Hazardous substances in fresh and marine water can harm aquatic life and pose a risk to human health, according to a new report published today by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report notes that while European legislation to address the issue is relatively strong, new challenges exist including ‘emerging pollutants’ where potential effects are not yet fully understood. More effort is also needed to ensure that chemicals are produced and used more sustainably.
Located in News
Publication text/x-sh Hazardous substances in Europe's fresh and marine waters — An overview
Chemicals are an essential part of our daily lives and are used to produce consumer goods, to protect or restore our health and to boost food production, to name but a few examples. Some chemicals, however, are hazardous, raising concerns for the environment and human health. Hazardous substances are emitted to fresh and marine waters via a number of pathways and can have detrimental effects on aquatic biota. Humans can be exposed to hazardous substances in water through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and the consumption of contaminated freshwater fish and seafood. A wide range of legislation now exists in Europe to address the release of hazardous substances to the environment, including water. New challenges exist, however, including the issues of chemical mixtures and emerging pollutants.
Located in Publications
Figure object code Health impact of PM mass concentrations (µg/m3). Loss in statistical life expectancy (months) that can be attributed to anthropogenic contributions to PM2.5 for the year 2000 (left) and for 2020 (right) for the CAFE baseline scenario
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Article Health in a changing climate
In August 2007, local health authorities in Italy detected a high number of cases of an unusual illness in Castiglione di Cervia and Castiglione di Ravenna, two small villages divided by a river. Almost 200 people were affected and one elderly man died (Angelini et al., 2007).
Located in Signals — well-being and the environment Signals 2011 Articles
Infographic D source code How are the environment and our well-being and health connected?
Natural resources fuel our production and consumption, and create wealth and jobs, contributing to our quality of life and well-being. But our level of resource consumption is undermining our ecosystems’ capacity to provide for us in the future.
Located in Media Infographics
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Phone: +45 3336 7100