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Sound and independent information
on the environment

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Data Dominant land cover types 2000
Dominant land cover types are defined by classification of the CORILIS layers into dominant classes
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Data Dominant land cover types 2000
Dominant land cover types are defined by classification of the CORILIS layers into dominant classes
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Figure C source code Dominant landscape types and definition of the coastal extent in LEAC
Integration of environmental accounts in coastal zones and in 4 CEEC
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Dominant landscape types of Europe, based on Corine land cover 2000
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Dominant landscapes
Landscapes as groupings of landcover types
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication EEA Report 2/2006 - Integration of environment into EU agriculture policy - the IRENA indicator-based assessment report
This report aims to provide a fair reflection of the progress, the achievements and obstacles in the integration of environmental concerns into EU agriculture policy, based on indicators developed in the IRENA operation (see Section 1.3). It also tackles limitations to successful policy implementation at Member State level, and challenges ahead.
Located in Publications
Figure Effect of road network density on the abundance of brown hare in Canton Aargau, Switzerland
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Example illustrating the relationship between effective mesh size and effective
In this hypothetical example, the trend remains constant. A linear rise in effective mesh density (right) corresponds to a 1/x curve in the graph of the effective mesh size (left). A slower increase in fragmentation results in a flatter curve for effective mesh size, and a more rapid increase produces a steeper curve. It is therefore easier to read trends off the graph of effective mesh density (right).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Examples of the use of effective mesh density in monitoring systems of sustainable development, biodiversity, and landscape quality
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Formation of new land cover in the region of Valencia, Spain
Coloured areas on the image show where land cover change occurred between 1990 and 2000
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100