76 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type











































































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Publication Europe's ecological backbone: recognising the true value of our mountains
Europe's mountain areas have social, economic and environmental capital of significance for the entire continent. This importance has been recognised since the late 19th century through national legislation; since the 1970s through regional structures for cooperation; and since the 1990s through regional legal instruments for the Alps and Carpathians. The European Union (EU) first recognised the specific characteristics of mountain areas in 1975 through the designation of Less Favoured Areas (LFAs). During the last decade, EU cohesion policy and the Treaty of Lisbon have both focused specifically on mountains.
Located in Publications
Publication Europe's environment — The fourth assessment. Executive summary
Located in Publications
Figure European coastal lowlands most vulnerable to sea level rise
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data OpenDocument Spreadsheet European past floods
Dataset contains information on past floods in Europe since 1980, based on the reporting of EU Member States for the EU Floods Directive (2007/60/EC) and combined with information provided by relevant national authorities and global databases on natural hazards. Reported data have been assessed and processed by the ETC-ICM and the EEA.
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Figure Expected impact of climate change on future flood damage
Expected impact of climate change on future flood damage
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Exposure of population in European cities to flood risk under climate change (scenario A2 — high emissions; 100-years flood)
-
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File Extreme weather variations with climate change
(This video has no audio.) In the past decade Europe has been affected by three remarkable weather extremes. The summers of 1995 and 2003 were extremely hot throughout most parts of Europe. In contrast, 2002 was very wet and saw extreme flooding in central Europe. Changes are also projected for the amount of rainfall in Europe, which could more pronounced flooding. Cold winters (which occurred once every 10 years from 1961 to 1990) are likely to become rare and will almost entirely disappear by 2080. In contrast, by 2080 nearly every summer in many parts of Europe is projected to be hotter than the 10 % hottest summers in the current climate. In southern Europe, these changes are projected to occur even earlier (in Spain by the 2020s) (Parry, 2000). This could have severe consequences for agriculture, water resources and the frequency of forest fires in southern Europe. Source: EEA Report No 2/2004 "Impacts of Europe's changing climate" (published 18 Aug 2004)
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Figure Flood losses per thousand of GDP in the EU 1970-2005
The figure shows flood losses per thousand of GDP in the EU 1970-2005
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Flood plains of the river Elbe in the municipality of Dresden, Germany, during different flooding events
The figure shows the flooded area in Dresden during different flood events
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Flood risk in Europe: the long-term outlook
Floods in Central Europe have caused deaths and widespread property damage across parts of the Czech Republic, Germany and Austria. Such events are likely to increase in Europe for several reasons including climate change, according to recent assessments from the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in News
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100