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Sound and independent information
on the environment

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File Expert interview: transport and environment
Peder Jensen, EEA transport and the environment expert. Transport is harmful to the environment in many different ways. The most visible effect of transport is some of the emissions that we see: we can see the exhaust gas coming out of a car and at certain times it's very dirty and very dark. It's a very visible way where it's harming the environment, harming the air that we are all breathing. But there are also effects that are not quite so visible - when we are burning fuel in our engines we are emitting a lot of different gases and some of them are invisible greenhouse gases that help trap the heat in the atmosphere to get the earth to go warmer. One of the other important effects of transport is the noise impact. Noise means that people have a hard time sleeping, that they therefore don't get the rest that they need. It also affects the animals, disturbs their life, if roads or railroads run through nature areas it therefore means a reduced quality of life for both animals and people. Finally, transport infrastructure has a tendency to fragment natural habitats for animals. Lots of animals are disturbed by roads, they cannot cross the road, they are either scared off by the noise or they can't find ways to cross these different infrastructures and this means that the habitats they are living in don't work so well for their reproduction.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
File Explore the NOISE
Noise affects a large number of Europeans, which perceive it as one of the major environmental problems. It can affect people in both physiological and psychological ways, interfering with basic activities such as sleep, rest, study and communication. The NOISE database establishes a system of source identification, noise mapping and population exposure assessments based upon noise indicators for Europe.
Located in Media Audiovisuals
Highlight Finding Europe's quiet areas
At least 110 million people are adversely affected by noise from Europe’s busiest roads alone. People need to escape this pollution and access quiet places to work, relax and live a healthy life. Such ‘quiet areas’ should be protected under EU legislation, but how does this work in practice?
Located in News
Press Release Troff document Front-running cities changing transport, improving quality of life
Many cities in Europe are changing, according to a new report which points to rapid transformations in urban transport in some areas. While cycling and efficient public transport are becoming the norm in some urban areas, Europe’s transport sector is still a major contributor to excessive levels of greenhouse gases, air pollution and noise, the report says.
Located in Media News
Publication Good practice guide on noise exposure and potential health effects
This guide is intended to assist policy makers and competent authorities in understanding and fulfilling the action planning requirements of Directive 2002/49/EC
Located in Publications
Publication Good practice guide on quiet areas
Noise pollution is a growing problem for Europe’s environment. Transport and industry are the main sources of concern and long term exposure can damage human health and adversely affect ecosystems. European legislation aims to reduce noise pollution and also highlights the need to preserve areas that are currently unaffected. These so called quiet areas may be found, not only in rural areas, but also inside our busiest cities. They are not only where people recreate, but also where they live and work, so how can they be identified and preserved in order to protect environmental health and well-being? This report offers a digest of actions from all across Europe to identify and protect environments with good acoustic quality.
Located in Publications
Publication chemical/x-pdb Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
European marine regions include the north-east Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and the Mediterranean, Black and Baltic seas. Human activities — such as fishing, aquaculture and agriculture — and climate change cause large and severe impacts on Europe's coastal and marine ecosystems. The EU objective of halting biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met in either the coastal or the marine environment. Recognising the need for an integrated ecosystem-based approach to reduce pressures, the EU Integrated Maritime Policy allows for the development of sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. Its environmental pillar, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, aims to deliver 'good environmental status' of the marine environment by 2020, and the Common Fisheries Policy will be reformed in 2012 with the aim of achieving sustainable fisheries. Complementary policy efforts include the EU Water Framework Directive and other freshwater legislation, and the Habitats and Birds Directives.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Image Noise - Theme image
Located in Environmental topics Noise
Figure Noise data for 52 European cities
The questionnaire asked how many people were exposed to what noise classes.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Noise levels across Europe now mapped by new EEA application
European citizens will soon be able to access and upload data on noise levels in their area, thanks to a new application on the Eye on Earth online map service. The European Environment Agency (EEA) has developed NoiseWatch to help the many millions of people across the EU exposed to damaging levels of noise.
Located in News
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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