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Figure Average annual percentage change in final electricity consumption, EU-27 1990-2008
Most countries in the EU-27 experienced an overall increase in electricity consumption over the period from 1990 to 2008, except for Lithuania, Latvia, Romania and Bulgaria. During this period, the average annual growth rate of electricity consumption varied greatly by country, ranging from less than 1 % per year in Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Hungary, Slovakia and Estonia to over 4 % in Malta, Portugal, Spain, Ireland, Iceland, Cyprus and Turkey. The decrease or low growth in electricity consumption in the new Member States was a combined result of economic restructuring in the 1990s and a decrease or low growth of the total population in those countries
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Figure Average annual percentage change in final electricity consumption, EU-27, 1990-2009
Average annual percentage change in final electricity consumption, EU-27, 1990-2009
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Figure Changes in household electricity and gas prices, 2005-2007
Electricity prices are those paid by an average consumer with an annual consumption of 3 500 kWh, of which 1 300 are consumed at night
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Figure Troff document CO2 emissions intensity of electricity and heat output
The emissions intensity is the level of CO2, emissions per GWh of electricity and heat produced.
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Figure CO2 reductions in EU-15 for electricity and heat production, 1990-2002
Emissions data for Luxembourg is not available and so this country is not included in the calculation for the European Union
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Figure Decomposition analysis of CO2 emission trends from public electricity and heat production in the EU, 1990–2008
Each bar shows the contribution of a single driver on GHG emission trends during a determined period. The thick short black lines indicate the combined effect of all emission drivers, i.e. the overall GHG emission trend during the period considered.
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Figure Decomposition analysis of the main factors influencing the CO2 emissions from public electricity and heat production between 1990 and 2004
The orange bars show the factors that have an increasing effect on emissions whereas the green bars show the factors that have a reduction effect
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Figure Decomposition analysis of the main factors influencing the CO2 emissions from public electricity and heat production (1990-2005)
The orange bars show the factors that have an increasing effect on emissions and the green bars show the factors that have a reducing effect
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Figure Efficiency (electricity and heat) production from conventional thermal plants, 1990, 2008
The average energy efficiency of conventional thermal electricity and heat production in the EU-27 improved over the period 1990-2008 by 6.3% to reach 49.8 %in 2008 (48.5 % excluding district heating). The EEA efficiencies exclude Norway (for conventional), and Norway and Switzerland (for public conventional) - their efficiencies are above 100% in either 1990 or 2008 because the electricity consumed for heating is not considered as an input although the heating from electric boilers is considered in total output. Swedish conventional and public conventional efficiencies are above 100% in some years (when including district heating), but not in 1990 or in 2008, so Sweden is included in the charts.
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Figure Efficiency (electricity and heat) from public conventional thermal plants, 1990, 2008
For public thermal power plants the average efficiency increased in most countries over the period 1990-2008, resulting in a net efficiency of 49.8% in 2008 (48.2% excluding district heating). The EEA efficiencies exclude Norway (for conventional), and Norway and Switzerland (for public conventional) - their efficiencies are above 100% in either 1990 or 2008 because the electricity consumed for heating is not considered as an input although the heating from electric boilers is considered in total output. Swedish conventional and public conventional efficiencies are above 100% in some years (when including district heating), but not in 1990 or in 2008, so Sweden is included in the charts.
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European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100