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Figure Maximum ozone hole area in 2010
False-color view of total ozone over the Antarctic pole. The purple and blue colors are where there is the least ozone, and the yellows and reds are where there is more ozone. Measured by October 1.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Maximum ozone hole area in 2011
False-color view of total ozone over the Antarctic pole. The purple and blue colors are where there is the least ozone, and the yellows and reds are where there is more ozone. Measured in 12 September 2011.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Mitigating climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The EU emitted close to 5 billion tonnes (Gt) of CO2-equivalent emissions in 2008. It contributes today around 12 % of annual global anthropogenic direct greenhouse gas emissions. The EU is making good progress towards achieving its emission reduction targets. A rapid, sustained and effective transition to a low carbon economy is necessary to mitigate climate change and to meet global greenhouse gas emission targets.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Publication Ozone-depleting substances 2011 - Summary
Aggregated data reported by companies on the production, import, export, destruction and use of ozone-depleting substances in the European Union.
Located in Publications
Publication Ozone-depleting substances 2012
Aggregated data reported by companies on the import, export, production, destruction and feedstock and process agent use of ozone-depleting substances in the European Union – SUMMARY
Located in Publications
Highlight Potent greenhouse gases – fluorinated gases in the European Union
The European Environment Agency (EEA) has published new aggregated information on the production and trade of fluorinated gases – or F-gases – in the EU. Although emitted in relatively small quantities, the emissions of these gases are increasing, and many are several thousand times more powerful greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide (CO2).
Located in News
Indicator Assessment Production and consumption of ozone depleting substances (CSI 006) - Assessment published Dec 2011
The total production and consumption of ozone depleting substances in EEA member countries has decreased significantly since the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987, nowadays it is practically zero. Globally, the implementation of the Montreal Protocol has led to a decrease in the atmospheric burden of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the lower atmosphere and in the stratosphere. Many ODSs are also potent greenhouse gases. The phasing out of ODS under the Montreal Protocol has reduced global greenhouse gas emissions by an amount 5 to 6 times larger than the UNFCCC's Kyoto Protocol target for the first commitment period, 2008-2012.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Production and consumption of ozone depleting substances
Indicator Assessment Production and consumption of ozone depleting substances (CSI 006) - Assessment published Dec 2012
The total production and consumption of ozone depleting substances in EEA member countries has decreased significantly since the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987 -  nowadays it is practically zero. Globally, the implementation of the Montreal Protocol has led to a decrease in the atmospheric burden of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in the lower atmosphere and in the stratosphere. Many of the ODS are also potent greenhouse gases in their own right, but as they are governed through the Montreal Protocol, they are not separately regulated under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Thus the phasing out of ODS under the Montreal Protocol has also avoided global greenhouse gas emissions. In 2010, it has been estimated that the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions  achieved under the Montreal Protocol was 5 to 6 times larger than that which will result from the UNFCCC's Kyoto Protocol first commitment period, 2008-2012.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Production and consumption of ozone depleting substances
Policy Document Regulation (EC) No 1005/2009 on substances that deplete the ozone layer
Regulation (EC) No 1005/2009 on substances that deplete the ozone layer
Located in Environmental policy document catalogue
Policy Document Regulation (EU) No 744/2010
Commission Regulation (EU) 744/2010: Amending Regulation (EC) No 1005/2009 on substances that deplete the ozone layer, with regard to the critical uses of halons
Located in Environmental policy document catalogue
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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