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Sound and independent information
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Publication application/x-troff-ms 10 messages for 2010 - Coastal ecosystems
Key messages: 1) As an interface between land and sea, European coastlines provide vital resources for wildlife, but also for the economy and human health and well-being. 2) Multiple pressures, including habitat loss and degradation, pollution, climate change and overexploitation of fish stocks, affect coastal ecosystems. 3) Coastal habitat types and species of Community interest are at risk in Europe; two thirds of coastal habitat types and more than half of coastal species have an unfavourable conservation status. 4) Integrated and ecosystem-based approaches provide the foundation for sustainable coastal management and development, supporting socio-economic development, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Coordinated action at the global, regional and local levels will be key to sustainable management of coastal ecosystems.
Located in Publications
File chemical/x-pdb 50 years of protecting Europe's environment
Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.
Located in Environmental topics Policy instruments Multimedia
Figure Absolute source apportioned nitrogen load to Danish coastal waters in the period 1981-2004, divided into diffuse load, point sources to freshwater and point sources to marine waters
Load-oriented approach.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Adapting to climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Climate change is happening and will continue to have far-reaching consequences for human and natural systems. Impacts and vulnerabilities differ considerably across regions, territories and economic sectors in Europe. Strategies to adapt to climate change are necessary to manage impacts even if global temperature stays below a 2 °C increase above the pre-industrial level. The EU adaptation framework aims at developing a comprehensive strategy by 2013, to be supported by a clearinghouse for sharing and maintaining information on climate change impacts, vulnerability and adaptation.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Adapting to climate change — key message 3
Vulnerabilities differ across regions, sectors and communities, with pronounced consequences expected in the Mediterranean basin, north-western and central-eastern Europe and the Arctic. Many coastal zones, mountains and areas prone to river floods are particularly vulnerable, as are cities and urban areas. In some sectors and regions new opportunities may occur. However, with increases in both temperatures and the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, adverse effects are likely to dominate in the medium to long term.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Adapting to climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Figure Analysis of coastal areas by dominant landscape types
Figure left: Sprawl of artificial areas 1990-2000 on Europen coasts, by dominant land cover types, km2 Figure right: Conversion from other land cover to agriculture 1990-2000 on Europen coasts, by dominant land cover types, km2
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Assessing biodiversity in Europe — the 2010 report
The present report considers the status and trends of pan-European biodiversity, and the implications of these trends for biodiversity management policy and practice. It considers the key biodiversity policy instruments currently applied in Europe, the threats to biodiversity and their management implications across major habitat types. The implications for biodiversity of cross-cutting issues such as tourism and urban planning are also considered, along with the challenges that remain for conserving and sustainably using of Europe's biodiversity. The report makes use of the SEBI 2010 indicators and other relevant national and regional information sources. It does not consider the biodiversity of EU overseas territories and outermost regions.
Located in Publications
Figure Average (1992-2003) of bathing water sampling points compliance in percentage of the total number
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Balancing the future of Europe's coasts — knowledge base for integrated management
The objective of this report is to frame an analytical approach for coastal areas in Europe, and to place this in the context of the new socio‑economic drivers of sustainable growth, and the formation of a new integrated policy framework. This framework builds on an ecosystem‑based management approach and integrated spatial planning and management. The report presents some key sustainability challenges for European coastal areas and waters, and highlights the need for a consolidated knowledge base and widespread information‑sharing to support informed policy development and management actions.
Located in Publications
Figure Blue Flags in marinas and beaches (2004)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100