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Daviz Visualization Urban sprawl by country and within countries (2009)
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Data Urban morphological zones changes 1990-2000
Urban morphological zones (UMZ) are defined by Corine land cover classes considered to contribute to the urban tissue and function
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Data Urban morphological zones 1990
Urban morphological zones (UMZ) are defined by Corine land cover classes considered to contribute to the urban tissue and function
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Data Urban morphological zones 2006
Urban morphological zones (UMZ) are defined by Corine land cover classes considered to contribute to the urban tissue and function
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Data Urban morphological zones 2000
Urban morphological zones (UMZ) are defined by Corine land cover classes considered to contribute to the urban tissue and function
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Data Urban morphological zones changes 2000-2006
F4v0 - Urban morphological zones (UMZ) are defined by Corine land cover classes considered to contribute to the urban tissue and function
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Daviz Visualization Urban sprawl in Europe on the level of countries
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Figure D source code Rings of 1 km around the centre of Lyon
Example of calculation
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Urban sprawl eating into wildlife habitats in Europe
As cities expand into the countryside, the habitats of many animals and plants are reduced. Roads, railways, car parks and buildings also split up habitats, dividing wildlife populations into increasingly smaller groups.
Located in News
Indicator Assessment Land take (CSI 014/LSI 001) - Assessment published Jun 2013
Land take by the expansion of residential areas and construction sites is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of urban land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them. The annual land take in European countries assessed by 2006 Corine land cover project (EEA39 except Greece) was approximately 108 000 ha/year in 2000-2006. In 21 countries covered by both periods (1990-2000 and 2000-2006) the annual land take decreased by 9 % in the later period. The composition of land taken areas changed, too. More arable land and permanent crops and less pastures and mosaic farmland were taken by artificial development then in 1990-2000. Identified trends are expected to change little when next assessment for 2006-2012 becomes available in 2014.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100