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Highlight Improving transparency in water services
The average European directly uses approximately 130 litres of water per day. Better access to data on water supply and treatment may help Europe use this precious resource more efficiently, according to a new report on water utilities.
Located in News
SOER Key fact Freshwater Quality - key fact 2
In northern Europe, over 80 % of the population is connected to municipal treatment works via a sewer network while in central Europe the figure is above 95 %. Elsewhere in Europe, connection rates are lower, although in the case of the newer EU Member States, this is explained by the later compliance dates agreed in the accession treaties.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key facts
Publication chemical/x-pdb Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
European marine regions include the north-east Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and the Mediterranean, Black and Baltic seas. Human activities — such as fishing, aquaculture and agriculture — and climate change cause large and severe impacts on Europe's coastal and marine ecosystems. The EU objective of halting biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met in either the coastal or the marine environment. Recognising the need for an integrated ecosystem-based approach to reduce pressures, the EU Integrated Maritime Policy allows for the development of sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. Its environmental pillar, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, aims to deliver 'good environmental status' of the marine environment by 2020, and the Common Fisheries Policy will be reformed in 2012 with the aim of achieving sustainable fisheries. Complementary policy efforts include the EU Water Framework Directive and other freshwater legislation, and the Habitats and Birds Directives.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Publication Pascal source code Pharmaceuticals in the environment — Result of an EEA workshop
Located in Publications
Publication Territorial cohesion — Analysis of environmental aspects of the EU Cohesion Policy in selected countries
Located in Publications
Publication Feasibility study: Modelling environmental concentrations of chemicals from emission data
Located in Publications
Publication Priority issues in the Mediterranean environment (revised version)
Following the principles of the European Thematic Strategy on the Protection and Conservation of the Marine Environment, the collective interest of EEA and UNEP/MAP has been developed towards a product focusing on priority pollution zones in the Mediterranean Sea and addressing emerging issues. All these issues come under the prism of an ecosystem approach. The core of this report derives from the latest (2003–2004) country National Diagnostic Analyses reports (NDA).
Located in Publications
File Sources of water pollution
(Transcription of audio on video) Water can be polluted from many sources. Faecal contamination from sewage makes water unpleasant and unsafe for recreational activities such as swimming, boating or fishing. Many organic pollutants, including sewage effluent and farm and food-processing wastes consume oxygen, suffocating fish and other aquatic life. Nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, from everything from farm fertilisers to household detergents, can 'overfertilise' the water causing the growth of large mats of algae, some of which are directly toxic. When the algae die, they sink to the water bottom, decomposing, consuming oxygen and damaging ecosystems. Chemical contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and some industrial chemicals can threaten wildlife and human health. Sediment run-off from the land can make water muddy, blocking sunlight and, as a result, killing wildlife. And irrigation, especially when used improperly, can bring flows of salts, nutrients and other pollutants from soils into water. Source: SOER 2005
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
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