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GIS Map Application Artificial Surfaces in Europe
Built areas in Europe
Located in Data and maps Interactive maps
Publication Progress towards halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010
This report assesses farmland, forests, freshwater ecosystems, marine and coastal systems, wetlands of international importance and mountain ecosystems in order to provide evidence of progress — or lack of progress — towards the 2010 target of halting the loss of biodiversity.
Located in Publications
Publication Urban sprawl in Europe - The ignored challenge
The ignored challenge
Located in Publications
Publication EEA Briefing 4/2006 - Urban sprawl in Europe
Located in Publications
Publication EEA Briefing 3/2006 - The continuous degradation of Europe's coasts threatens European living standards
Located in Publications
Publication chemical/x-pdb Urban environment - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The global population is congregating in our cities. Eighty per cent of the world’s estimated nine billion people in 2050 are expected to live in urban areas. Our cities and urban areas face many challenges from social to health to environmental. The impacts of cities and urban areas are felt in other regions which supply cities with food, water and energy and absorb pollution and waste. However, the proximity of people, businesses and services associated with the very word ‘city’ means that there are also huge opportunities. Indeed, well designed, well managed urban settings offer a key opportunity for sustainable living.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
Figure Urban sprawl in Luxemburg driven by socio-economic changes (1990-2000)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Urban sprawl on the Mediterranean coast: souheast Spain (1990-200)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data Urban morphological zones 1990
Urban morphological zones (UMZ) are defined by Corine land cover classes considered to contribute to the urban tissue and function
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Indicator Assessment Land take
Land take by the expansion of residential areas and construction sites is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of urban land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them. The annual land take in European countries assessed by 2006 Corine land cover project (EEA39 except Greece) was approximately 108 000 ha/year in 2000-2006. In 21 countries covered by both periods (1990-2000 and 2000-2006) the annual land take decreased by 9 % in the later period. The composition of land taken areas changed, too. More arable land and permanent crops and less pastures and mosaic farmland were taken by artificial development then in 1990-2000. Identified trends are expected to change little when next assessment for 2006-2012 becomes available in 2014.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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