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Figure Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5) and total ammonium concentrations in rivers between 1992 and 2011
Concentrations are expressed as annual mean concentrations. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). The number of river monitoring stations included per country is given in metadata (see downloads and more info). BOD7 data has been recalculated into BOD5 data. If data on total ammonium are not available, data on ammonium are included into the data series.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure BOD5 concentrations in rivers between 1992 and 2011 draining to different sea regions of Europe
The sea region data series are calculated as the average of annual mean data from river monitoring stations in each sea region. The data thus represents rivers or river basins draining into that particular sea. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). The number of river monitoring stations included per sea region is given in parentheses. There were no stations with consistent data series on BOD7 in rivers draining to the Arctic Ocean. BOD7 data has been recalculated into BOD5 data.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data Visualization Annual variation in the ozone AOT40 value for crops (May-July)
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Figure Packaging waste generation per capita and by country
Packaging waste
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Treatment of packaging waste in the EU-27
packaging waste
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Final energy consumption in the industry sectors
The figure shows the development of the final energy consumption in the different industry sectors.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Bathing water quality
The quality of water at designated bathing beaches in Europe (coastal and inland) has improved significantly since 1992. Compliance with mandatory values in EU coastal bathing waters increased from 82.3 % in 1992 to 95.6 % in 2009. Compliance with guide values likewise rose from 71.1 % to 89 %. In 1992, 37.4 % of EU inland bathing areas complied with mandatory values compared to 89.4 % in 2009. Similarly, the rate of compliance with guide values moved from 22 % in 1992 to 70.7 % in 2009.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Bathing water quality
Indicator Assessment Bathing water quality
The quality of water at designated bathing beaches in Europe (coastal and inland) has improved throughout the 1990s into 2000's. In 2006, 96 % of coastal bathing waters and 89 % of inland bathing waters complied with the mandatory standards.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Bathing water quality
Indicator Assessment Land take
Land take by the expansion of artificial areas and related infrastructure is the main cause of the increase in the coverage of land at the European level. Agricultural zones and, to a lesser extent, forests and semi-natural and natural areas, are disappearing in favour of the development of artificial surfaces. This affects biodiversity since it decreases habitats, the living space of a number of species, and fragments the landscapes that support and connect them.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Land take
Indicator Assessment Progress in management of contaminated sites
Soil contamination requiring clean up is present at approximately 250000 sites in the EEA member countries, according to recent estimates. And this number is expected to grow. Potentially polluting activities are estimated to have occurred at nearly 3 million sites (including the 250000 sites already mentioned) and investigation is needed to establish whether remediation is required. If current investigation trends continue, the number of sites needing remediation will increase by 50% by 2025. By contrast, more than 80000 sites have been cleaned up in the last 30 years in the countries where data on remediation is available. Although the range of polluting activities (and their relative importance as localised sources of soil contamination) may vary considerably across Europe, industrial and commercial activities as well as the treatment and disposal of waste are reported to be the most important sources. National reports indicate that heavy metals and mineral oil are the most frequent soil contaminants at investigated sites, while mineral oil and chlorinated hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants found in groundwater. A considerable share of remediation expenditure, about 35% on average, comes from public budgets. Although considerable efforts have been made already, it will take decades to clean up a legacy of contamination.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Progress in management of contaminated sites
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100