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Figure Trend in winter oxidized nitrogen concentrations in coastal and open waters of the Baltic, North East Atlantic (Greater North Sea, Celtic Seas) and Mediterranean Sea (Adriatic Sea), 1985 - 2010
The figure shows trend in winter oxidized nitrogen (nitrate + nitrite) concentrations in coastal and open waters of the Baltic, North East Atlantic (Greater North Sea, Celtic Seas) and Mediterranean Sea (Adriatic Sea) (% of stations showing a statistically significant change within the period 1985-2010). Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of stations included in the analysis for each country. "Open sea" is the total of all off-shore stations (>20km) within a (sub)region.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters (CSI 021) - Assessment published Mar 2013
In 2010, the highest concentrations of oxidized nitrogen were found in the Baltic Sea, in the Gulf of Riga and Kiel Bay, and in Belgian, Dutch and German coastal waters in the Greater North Sea. Reported stations in the Northern Spanish and Croatian coastal waters also showed high concentration levels. The highest orthophosphate concentrations were found in the Baltic Sea, in the Gulf of Riga and Kiel Bay, and in Irish, Belgian, Dutch and German coastal waters in the Greater North Sea. Coastal stations along Northern Spain and Southern France also showed high concentration levels. Between 1985 and 2010, overall nutrient concentrations have been either stable or decreasing in stations reported to the EEA in the Greater North Sea, Celtic Seas and in the Baltic Sea. However, this decrease has been more pronounced for nitrogen. Assessments for the overall Mediterranean and Black Sea regions were not possible, data only being available for stations in France and Croatia.  For oxidized nitrogen concentrations, 14% of all the reported stations showed decreasing trends, whereas only 2% showed increasing trends. Decreases were most evident in the Baltic Sea (coastal waters of Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Finland, and open waters) and in southern part of the coast of the Greater North Sea. Increasing trends were mainly found in Croatian coastal stations.  For orthophosphate concentrations, 10% of all the reported stations showed a decrease. This was most evident in coastal and open water stations in the Greater North Sea, and in coastal stations in the Baltic Sea. Increasing orthophosphate trends, observed in 6% of the reported stations, were mainly detected in Irish, Danish and Finnish coastal waters (Gulf of Finland and Gulf of Bothnia) and in open waters of the Baltic Proper.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters
Figure Sector share of nitrogen oxides emissions (EEA member countries)
The contribution made by different sectors to emissions of nitrogen oxides.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Change in nitrogen oxides emissions for each sector between 1990 and 2009 (EEA member countries)
Percentage change in nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions for each sector between 1990 and 2009.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication EEA Briefing 1/2006 - Assessing environmental integration in EU agriculture
Located in Publications
Publication chemical/x-pdb Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
European marine regions include the north-east Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and the Mediterranean, Black and Baltic seas. Human activities — such as fishing, aquaculture and agriculture — and climate change cause large and severe impacts on Europe's coastal and marine ecosystems. The EU objective of halting biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met in either the coastal or the marine environment. Recognising the need for an integrated ecosystem-based approach to reduce pressures, the EU Integrated Maritime Policy allows for the development of sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. Its environmental pillar, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, aims to deliver 'good environmental status' of the marine environment by 2020, and the Common Fisheries Policy will be reformed in 2012 with the aim of achieving sustainable fisheries. Complementary policy efforts include the EU Water Framework Directive and other freshwater legislation, and the Habitats and Birds Directives.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Publication Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The continuing presence of a range of pollutants in a number of Europe's freshwaters threatens aquatic ecosystems and raises concerns for public health. Current reporting under the EU Water Framework Directive shows that a substantial proportion of Europe's freshwaters are at risk of not achieving the aim of 'good status' by 2015. Driven by the EU Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD), improvements in the collection and treatment of wastewater in some regions of Europe have led to a reduction in the discharge of some pollutants to fresh and coastal waters. Challenges remain, however, because UWWTD implementation remains incomplete and other significant sources of water pollution exist, especially agriculture and urban storm flows. The implementation of effective and timely measures, required under the WFD, needs to encompass a greater focus on controls 'at source' and the efficient use of resources including water, energy and chemicals.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Publication Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Emissions of air pollutants derive from almost all economic and societal activities. They result in clear risks to human health and ecosystems. In Europe, policies and actions at all levels have greatly reduced anthropogenic emissions and exposure but some air pollutants still harm human health. Similarly, as emissions of acidifying pollutants have reduced, the situation for Europe's rivers and lakes has improved but atmospheric nitrogen oversupply still threatens biodiversity in sensitive terrestrial and water ecosystems. The movement of atmospheric pollution between continents attracts increasing political attention. Greater international cooperation, also focusing on links between climate and air pollution policies, is required more than ever to address air pollution.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Biodiversity — key message 3
Land-use change and intensification are causing further fragmentation and homogenisation of forests and agro-ecosystems. Although some decline in freshwater nutrients has been observed, eutrophication of terrestrial ecosystems continues to be a matter of concern as shown by excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition in all EU countries.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Biodiversity — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Air pollution — key message 2
As the amounts of acidifying air pollutants have fallen, the area of acid-sensitive ecosystems (such as freshwaters and forest soils) adversely affected in Europe has considerably reduced. Nonetheless, biological recovery in freshwaters is slow. The area of sensitive terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems affected by an excess input of atmospheric nitrogen in the EEA-32 has only diminished slightly between 1990 and 2010. The EU’s long-term objective of not exceeding the so-called critical atmospheric pollutant loads, which ecosystems can tolerate, has not been met.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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