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Publication Air pollution by ozone across Europe during summer 2007
Located in Publications
File Repairing our ozone layer
In 1987, delegates from around the world signed the Montreal Protocol designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of a number of substances believed to be responsible for ozone depletion. This recent video illustrates the results of the Protocol, which is considered to be one of the most successful international environmental agreements.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Multimedia
Figure Projections of total emissions of ozone precursors Light-duty Vehicles, Freight Trucks, Buses, and 2-3 wheelers (thousand tonnes per year) in Former Soviet Union region
Geographical coverage: no individual countries are presented
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Air pollution by ozone in Europe in summer 2006
Located in Publications
Folder Pascal source code Interactive maps and data
The EEA provides access to validated air quality data and unvalidated up-to-date air quality data on ambient air concentrations measured at monitoring stations across Europe.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Air quality levels in Europe
Publication Air pollution by ozone in Europe in summer 2005
Located in Publications
Publication Air quality and ancillary benefits of climate change policies
The Thematic Strategy on air pollution aims to improve European air pollution significantly by 2020. This report from the European Environment Agency looks a further ten years into the future, and brings together two major policy challenges — combating climate change and reducing air pollution — in an integrated way. Thus, the report analyses projected changes in European air quality up to 2030, and explores the possible benefits of climate policies on air quality and the costs of air pollution abatement.
Located in Publications
Publication EEA Briefing 2/2006 - Air quality and ancillary benefits of climate change policies
Located in Publications
File C source code header Air quality and health
(Transcription of audio on video) Europe loses 200 million working days a year to air pollution-related illness. The air pollutants that affect the respiratory system are ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, and particulate matter. The breathing in of fine particulate matter significantly increases the numbers of deaths from cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary diseases. Over a third of particulate matter comes from domestic wood stoves, another third from industrial sources, and the remainder from transport and agriculture. Ground level ozone, one of the components of smog and produced through vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions, also has severe implications for respiratory health. The European Commission Clean Air for Europe programme found that in the year 2000 around 350,000 people were dying prematurely due to outdoor pollution of fine particulate matter alone. Although levels of particulate matter and ozone have both been reducing in recent decades, estimates indicate that 20 million Europeans suffer from respiratory problems. Source: The European environment - State and outlook 2005
Located in Environmental topics Environment and health Multimedia
File Creation of low level ozone
HOW LOW LEVEL OZONE IS CREATED Low level ozone pollution is often not given much consideration next to the depletion of the ozone layer. However, it can damage health of humans, animals, trees and plants. In high quantities it also contributes to acid rain and the green house effect, as well as being partly responsible for photo chemical smog. Car exhausts release nitrogen oxides into the atmosphere. Volatile Organic Compounds are released through chemical plants and products including solvents, paints and hairspray. These two chemicals react with each other and sunlight to create ozone. In humans, ozone can cause lung tissue damage, and create high incidences of asthma and allergenic reactions. Plants exposed to high ozone concentrations lose their chlorophyll and their food manufacturing abilities.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Multimedia
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Phone: +45 3336 7100