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Highlight D source code Carbon capture and storage could also impact air pollution
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing carbon dioxide released by power stations and other industrial sources, and burying it deep underground. But in addition to keeping an important greenhouse gas (GHG) out of the atmosphere, this technology will lead to benefits and trade-offs for air pollution. A new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA) describes the effects that CCS may have on emissions of some key air pollutants.
Located in News
Publication Air pollution impacts from carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) consists of the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plants and/or CO2-intensive industries such as refineries, cement, iron and steel, its subsequent transport to a storage site, and finally its injection into a suitable underground geological formation for the purposes of permanent storage. It is considered to be one of the medium term 'bridging technologies' in the portfolio of available mitigation actions for stabilising concentrations of atmospheric CO2, the main greenhouse gas (GHG).
Located in Publications
Highlight Ozone and particulates most serious air quality problems in Europe
Air quality in Europe has improved between 1990 and 2009, as emissions of most pollutants have fallen, according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). But there is still a lot of room for improvement, as many EU countries are expected to exceed the emissions ceilings in 2010 for at least one pollutant. In addition, concentration levels of ground-level ozone and particulate matter have remained stable over recent years despite efforts to improve air quality.
Located in News
Publication NEC Directive status report 2010
Reporting by the Member States under Directive 2001/81/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2001 on national emission ceilings for certain atmospheric pollutants
Located in Publications
Highlight EU to exceed nitrogen oxides emission ceiling, mostly due to road transport
The EU-27 and its Member States must meet legally binding limits for four air pollutants set by the National Emission Ceilings Directive (NEC Directive) to protect human health and the environment. The annual status report released today by the European Environment Agency (EEA) shows that while EU-27 emissions for three air pollutants are projected to meet the ceilings, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions for the EU-27 as a whole will exceed its ceiling by 17 %. Ten Member States expect to miss their respective NOx ceilings.
Located in News
Publication Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Emissions of air pollutants derive from almost all economic and societal activities. They result in clear risks to human health and ecosystems. In Europe, policies and actions at all levels have greatly reduced anthropogenic emissions and exposure but some air pollutants still harm human health. Similarly, as emissions of acidifying pollutants have reduced, the situation for Europe's rivers and lakes has improved but atmospheric nitrogen oversupply still threatens biodiversity in sensitive terrestrial and water ecosystems. The movement of atmospheric pollution between continents attracts increasing political attention. Greater international cooperation, also focusing on links between climate and air pollution policies, is required more than ever to address air pollution.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
Figure Emission trends of acidifying pollutants (EEA member countries, EU-27)
This chart shows past emission trends of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and ammonia (NH3) in the EEA-32 and EU-27 group of countries. In addition - for the EU-27 - the aggregated Member State 2010 emission ceiling for the respective pollutants are shown.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Contributions by sector for emissions of acidifying pollutants (EEA member countries)
The contribution made by different sectors to emissions of acidifying pollutants
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Sector contributions of emissions of primary particulate matter and secondary precursors (EEA member countries)
The contribution made by different sectors to emissions of primary PM2.5 and PM10, and to emissions of the secondary particulate matter precursors.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Contribution to total change in ammonia emissions for each sector (EEA member countries)
The contribution made by each sector to the total change in ammonia (NH3) emissions between 1990 and 2008.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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