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Publication Water resources: quantity and flows - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Europe's freshwaters are affected by water scarcity, droughts, floods and physical modifications. Many water bodies are at risk of failing to meet the aim of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) to achieve good status by 2015. Future policies should encourage demand management through actions such as increasing water efficiency. In addition, water management will benefit from applying an ecosystems perspective, using floodplains and groundwater aquifers for storing water, and making room (space) for rivers.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Publication Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The continuing presence of a range of pollutants in a number of Europe's freshwaters threatens aquatic ecosystems and raises concerns for public health. Current reporting under the EU Water Framework Directive shows that a substantial proportion of Europe's freshwaters are at risk of not achieving the aim of 'good status' by 2015. Driven by the EU Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD), improvements in the collection and treatment of wastewater in some regions of Europe have led to a reduction in the discharge of some pollutants to fresh and coastal waters. Challenges remain, however, because UWWTD implementation remains incomplete and other significant sources of water pollution exist, especially agriculture and urban storm flows. The implementation of effective and timely measures, required under the WFD, needs to encompass a greater focus on controls 'at source' and the efficient use of resources including water, energy and chemicals.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
SOER Message Water resources: quantity and flows — key message 1
Many European river basins and waters have been altered by such human activities as water abstraction, land drainage, and dams. These often lead to major adverse ecological effects and leave limited space for natural habitats. Because of these problems and poor water quality the aim of the Water Framework Directive to achieve good status by 2015 may not be met.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Water resources: quantity and flows - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Water resources: quantity and flows — key message 6
Good water resource management is required to meet the needs of a resource efficient future, sustain human and economic development and maintain the essential functions of our water ecosystems. The solutions lie in more integrated and sustainable water management, integration of water aspects in sector policies (for example, the Common Agricultural Policy), improved accounting for water efficiency and the full implementation of the Water Framework Directive and other water policies.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Water resources: quantity and flows - SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Key fact Freshwater Quality - key fact 4
A substantial proportion of Europe’s freshwaters are at risk of not achieving good status under the EU Water Framework Directive by 2015 (40 % of surface waters and 30 % of groundwaters, in 2004).
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key facts
SOER Message Freshwater quality — key message 2
The Water Framework Directive, the single most important piece of legislation relating to the quality of Europe’s fresh and coastal waters, aims to attain good ecological and chemical status by 2015. For a number of freshwater bodies, substantial improvements will be required to meet this target.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Freshwater quality — key message 4
Diffuse pollution from both agriculture and urban areas remains a major pressure on Europe’s freshwater. Cost-effective measures to tackle both sources exist and can be implemented through the river basin management plans of the Water Framework Directive. Full compliance with the Nitrates Directive is also required.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Freshwater quality — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
Highlight PostScript document Europe's water information at your fingertips
Our demand for water and wastewater discharges, often have a substantial impact on the quality and quantity of freshwater resources. On World Water Day, 22 March, the European Environment Agency (EEA) and partners presented a new and improved version of the web portal Water Information System for Europe (WISE).
Located in News
Figure Relevant pressures for GWBs
Relative number of GWB where a pressure is significant (all classified GWBs and GWBs in poor quantitative status)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data WISE Groundwater
A GWB is defined in WFD Art. 2 as a distinct volume of groundwater within an aquifer or aquifers, whereas an aquifer is defined as a geological layer with significant groundwater flow. This definition of a GWB allows a wide scope of interpretations. The submission of GWB data to the Commission by the EU Member States was accomplished via the Reportnet platform, as a part of the dataflow for WFD. Art. 13 reporting. GWB data includes spatial data as GIS polygons and GWB characteristics in an XML schema. GWBs are registered to so-called horizons, which represent distinct vertical layers of groundwater resources.
Located in Data and maps Datasets
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100