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Indicator Assessment Chlorophyll in transitional, coastal and marine waters (CSI 023) - Assessment published Mar 2013
In 2010, the highest summer chlorophyll-a concentrations were observed in coastal areas and estuaries where nutrient concentrations are also generally high (see CSI 021 Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters). These include the Gulf of Riga, Gulf of Gdansk, Gulf of Finland and along the German coast in the Baltic Sea, coastal areas in Belgium and The Netherlands in the Greater North Sea and in few locations along the coast of Ireland and France in the Celtic Seas and Bay of Biscay, respectively. High chlorophyll concentrations were also observed along the Gulf of Lions and in Montenegro coastal waters in the Mediterranean Sea, and along Romanian coastal waters in the Black Sea. Low summer chlorophyll concentrations were mainly observed in the Kattegat and open sea stations in the Greater North Sea, and in open sea stations in southern Baltic Sea.  Between 1985 to 2010, decreasing chlorophyll concentrations (showed in 8% of all the stations in the European seas reported to the EEA) were predominantly found along the southern coast of the Greater North Sea, along the Finnish coast in the Bothnian Bay in the Baltic Sea and in a few stations in the Western Mediterranean Sea and Adriatic Sea. In the Black Sea, it was not possible to make an overall assessment due to the lack of time series data. Increasing concentrations (observed in 5% of the reported stations) were generally observed in coastal locations in the Northern Baltic Sea but also in the open sea stations outside the north of the Celtic Seas. Most stations (87%) however showed no changes over time.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Chlorophyll in transitional, coastal and marine waters
Figure text/texmacs Distribution of outcomes of assessments of species of European interest in coastal ecosystems
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Population in coastal settlements (2001)
Concentration of the European population in the coastal areas, especially cities and tourist destinations
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Troff document People expected to be at risk of flooding without adaptation in the medium-long term
People expected to be at risk of flooding without adaptation in the medium-long term
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Coastal flood damage potential
Damage potential of coastal flooding in Europe
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Progress towards halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010
This report assesses farmland, forests, freshwater ecosystems, marine and coastal systems, wetlands of international importance and mountain ecosystems in order to provide evidence of progress — or lack of progress — towards the 2010 target of halting the loss of biodiversity.
Located in Publications
Publication EEA Briefing 3/2006 - The continuous degradation of Europe's coasts threatens European living standards
Located in Publications
Publication The changing faces of Europe's coastal areas
This report provides information on the state of the environment in the coastal areas of Europe, and provides evidence of the need for a more integrated, long-term approach. Since 1995, concern about the state of Europe's coastline has led to a number of EU initiatives, which build on the concept of integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). ICZM attempts to balance the needs of development with protection of the very resources that sustain coastal economies. It also takes into account the public's concern about the deteriorating environmental, socio-economic and cultural state of the European coastline.
Located in Publications
Figure Relative change in land cover within 10 km of the coast in 27 European countries * 2000–2006
* including 20 EU Member States, data not available for Greece and the United Kingdom.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Troff document Conservation status of coastal habitat types of European Union interest in the EU-25
Conservation status of habitats per biogeographical area in coastal ecosystems
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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