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Sound and independent information
on the environment

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Indicator Assessment Efficiency of conventional thermal electricity generation (ENER 019) - Assessment published Aug 2011
The efficiency of electricity and heat production from conventional thermal power plants improved steadily from 43.5% in 1990 to 50.1% in 2005, but decreased to 49.8% in 2008 because of lower heat production. The improvement until 2005 was due to the closure of old inefficient plants, improvements in existing technologies, often combined with a switch from coal power plants to more efficient combined cycle gas-turbines. The environmental benefits resulting from the increase in efficiency of the conventional thermal electricity and heat production (including biomass were offset by the rapid growth in fossil-fuel based (oil, gas, coal & lignite) electricity production (38 % in the period 1990-2008, see ENER009).
Located in Data and maps Indicators Efficiency of conventional thermal electricity generation
Figure EU-15 and EU-27 CO2 emissions from public electricity and heat production compared with electricity production in thermal power plants and final electricity consumption
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Share of combined heat and power in gross electricity production in 2004
The most recent available data are for 2004.In Cyprus and Malta there was no CHP generation in 2004.The share is defined as the proportion of CHP electricity production (from both private and public utilities) in total gross electricity production, including generation in pumped storage power stations
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Daviz Visualization Efficiency (electricity and heat) of production from conventional thermal plants
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
SPARQL Efficiency (electricity and heat) production from conventional thermal plants - country groups
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations Semantic Data Service (sparql repository)
Figure EU-15 C02 emissions from public electricity and heat production compared with electricity production in thermal power plants and final electricity consumption
Left: This graph shows past (1990-2004) carbon dioxide emissions due to public electricity and heat production, and compares them with past and projected electricity production in thermal power plants and final electricity consumption
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Efficiency (electricity and heat) from autoproducers conventional thermal plants, 1990, 2010
Output from conventional thermal power stations consists of gross electricity generation and also of any heat sold to third parties (combined heat and power plants) by conventional thermal public utility power stations as well as autoproducer thermal power stations. Due to inconsistencies in the Eurostat data set Bulgaria, Greece, Lithuania, Luxembourg and Norway are excluded for all years (efficiencies >100%). For Cyprus, Iceland and Malta data on autoproducers is not available, therefore they are also excluded for all years.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Efficiency (electricity and heat) production from conventional thermal plants, 1990, 2008
The average energy efficiency of conventional thermal electricity and heat production in the EU-27 improved over the period 1990-2008 by 6.3% to reach 49.8 %in 2008 (48.5 % excluding district heating). The EEA efficiencies exclude Norway (for conventional), and Norway and Switzerland (for public conventional) - their efficiencies are above 100% in either 1990 or 2008 because the electricity consumed for heating is not considered as an input although the heating from electric boilers is considered in total output. Swedish conventional and public conventional efficiencies are above 100% in some years (when including district heating), but not in 1990 or in 2008, so Sweden is included in the charts.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Efficiency (electricity and heat) from public conventional thermal plants, 1990, 2008
For public thermal power plants the average efficiency increased in most countries over the period 1990-2008, resulting in a net efficiency of 49.8% in 2008 (48.2% excluding district heating). The EEA efficiencies exclude Norway (for conventional), and Norway and Switzerland (for public conventional) - their efficiencies are above 100% in either 1990 or 2008 because the electricity consumed for heating is not considered as an input although the heating from electric boilers is considered in total output. Swedish conventional and public conventional efficiencies are above 100% in some years (when including district heating), but not in 1990 or in 2008, so Sweden is included in the charts.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Observed changes in warm spells and frost days indices 1976-2006
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100