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Publication Air pollution by ozone in Europe in summer 2005
Located in Publications
Publication Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Emissions of air pollutants derive from almost all economic and societal activities. They result in clear risks to human health and ecosystems. In Europe, policies and actions at all levels have greatly reduced anthropogenic emissions and exposure but some air pollutants still harm human health. Similarly, as emissions of acidifying pollutants have reduced, the situation for Europe's rivers and lakes has improved but atmospheric nitrogen oversupply still threatens biodiversity in sensitive terrestrial and water ecosystems. The movement of atmospheric pollution between continents attracts increasing political attention. Greater international cooperation, also focusing on links between climate and air pollution policies, is required more than ever to address air pollution.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Publication Air pollution by ozone across Europe during summer 2011
Overview of exceedances of EC ozone threshold values for April–September 2011
Located in Publications
Highlight Hot summer weather exacerbating ozone pollution
Unusually high temperatures this summer may be contributing to poor air quality in many European cities. Thresholds to protect health from ground-level ozone have been exceeded across Europe in recent weeks, according to preliminary data reported to the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in News
Daviz Visualization D source code Projected differences in relative yield losses (RYL)
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Explore unvalidated ground level ozone statistics
Tool for exploring up-to-date unvalidated data on ground level ozone
Located in Environmental topics Air quality levels in Europe Ozone summer
Figure D source code Projected differences in relative yield losses (RYL), for wheat, rice, maize and soybeans, for major world regions
The figure showns projected yield losses due to elevated ozone concentrations. The 2030 scenario assumes the implementation of current legislation for the major world regions. Positive RYL values indicate an increase in crop yield loss in 2030 compared with 2005.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Ozone and particulates most serious air quality problems in Europe
Air quality in Europe has improved between 1990 and 2009, as emissions of most pollutants have fallen, according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). But there is still a lot of room for improvement, as many EU countries are expected to exceed the emissions ceilings in 2010 for at least one pollutant. In addition, concentration levels of ground-level ozone and particulate matter have remained stable over recent years despite efforts to improve air quality.
Located in News
Highlight Pascal source code Europe still playing catch-up on air pollution, despite reduction successes
The European Union appears to have met several objectives to reduce the impacts of air pollution, according to the original scientific understanding used to set the objectives. But when using the improved scientific understanding of air pollution now available, it becomes clear that emissions need to be even further reduced to protect health and the environment.
Located in News
File C source code header Air quality and health
(Transcription of audio on video) Europe loses 200 million working days a year to air pollution-related illness. The air pollutants that affect the respiratory system are ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, and particulate matter. The breathing in of fine particulate matter significantly increases the numbers of deaths from cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary diseases. Over a third of particulate matter comes from domestic wood stoves, another third from industrial sources, and the remainder from transport and agriculture. Ground level ozone, one of the components of smog and produced through vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions, also has severe implications for respiratory health. The European Commission Clean Air for Europe programme found that in the year 2000 around 350,000 people were dying prematurely due to outdoor pollution of fine particulate matter alone. Although levels of particulate matter and ozone have both been reducing in recent decades, estimates indicate that 20 million Europeans suffer from respiratory problems. Source: The European environment - State and outlook 2005
Located in Environmental topics Environment and health Multimedia
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100