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Figure Decomposition analysis of CO2 emission trends from passenger cars in the EU, 1990–2008
Each bar shows the contribution of a single driver to CO2 emission trends during a determined period. The thick short black lines indicate the combined effect of all emission drivers, i.e. the overall GHG emission trend during the period considered.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Daviz Visualization Average carbon dioxide emissions from new passenger cars
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Publication Annual European Community greenhouse gas inventory 1990-2004 and inventory report 2006
Located in Publications
Publication Energy and environment in the European Union - Tracking progress towards integration
Indicator-based report to measure progress of environmental integration within the energy sector.
Located in Publications
Publication Understanding climate change — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Average global air and ocean temperatures are rising, leading to the melting of snow and ice and rising global mean sea level. Ocean acidification results from higher CO2 concentrations. With unabated greenhouse gas emissions, climate change could lead to an increasing risk of irreversible shifts in the climate system with potentially serious consequences. Temperature rises of more than 1.5–2 °C above pre-industrial levels are likely to cause major societal and environmental disruptions in many regions. The atmospheric CO2 concentration needs to be stabilised at 350–400 parts per million (ppm) in order to have a 50 % chance of limiting global mean temperature increase to 2 °C above pre-industrial levels (according to the IPCC in 2007, and confirmed by later scientific insights).
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
Publication Mitigating climate change - SOER 2010 thematic assessment
The EU emitted close to 5 billion tonnes (Gt) of CO2-equivalent emissions in 2008. It contributes today around 12 % of annual global anthropogenic direct greenhouse gas emissions. The EU is making good progress towards achieving its emission reduction targets. A rapid, sustained and effective transition to a low carbon economy is necessary to mitigate climate change and to meet global greenhouse gas emission targets.
Located in The European environment — state and outlook 2015 Thematic assessments
Press Release HTML EEA: Current EU measures insufficient to prevent further increase of CO2 emissions after the year 2000
Located in Media News
Press Release Deep emission cuts give the EU a head start under the Kyoto Protocol
A new report by the European Environment Agency (EEA) shows that large drop in emissions seen in 2008 and 2009 gives EU-15 a head start to reach and even overachieve its 8 % reduction target under the Kyoto Protocol. Austria, Denmark and Italy, however, need to step up their current efforts until 2012 to ensure that their contribution to the common EU-15 target is delivered. The EEA report also shows that EU-27 is well on track towards achieving its 20 % reduction target by 2020.
Located in Media News
Press Release Recession and renewables cut greenhouse emissions in 2009
Greenhouse gas emissions decreased very sharply in 2009, by 7.1 % in the EU-27 and 6.9 % in the EU-15. These most recent results, compiled by the European Environment Agency (EEA), confirm estimates made by the EEA last year. This decrease was largely the result of the economic recession of 2009, but also sustained strong growth in renewable energy.
Located in Media News
Press Release D source code EU greenhouse gas emissions estimated to increase in 2010, but long-term decrease expected to continue
The European Union remains well on track to achieve its Kyoto Protocol target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions despite a 2.4 % emissions increase in 2010, according to first estimates by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The 2010 increase follows a 7 % drop in 2009, largely due to the economic recession and growth of renewable energy generation.
Located in Media News
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Phone: +45 3336 7100