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Figure Specific CO2 emissions per passenger-km and per mode of transport in Europe, 1995-2011
The graph shows development of specific CO2 emissions, defined as emissions of CO2 per transport unit (passenger-km), by passenger transport mode (road, rail, maritime, air) over the period 1995 to 2011. Data coverage: EEA-32 excluding Iceland and Liechtenstein
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Specific CO2 emissions per tonne-km and per mode of transport in Europe, 1995-2011
The graph shows development of specific CO2 emissions, defined as emissions of CO2 per transport unit (tonne-km), by freight transport mode (road, rail, maritime, inland shipping) over the period 1995 to 2011. Data coverage: EEA-32 excluding Iceland and Liechtenstein
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Specific CO2 emissions from road passenger and freight transport in Europe, 1995, 2005 and 2011
The graph shows development of specific CO2 emissions for the road transport mode, by category (passenger cars, vans, two wheelers, buses & coaches, light-duty vehicles, heavy-duty vehicles) in 1995, 2005 and 2011. Data coverage: EEA-32 excluding Iceland and Liechtenstein
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Press Release HTML EEA: Current EU measures insufficient to prevent further increase of CO2 emissions after the year 2000
Located in Media News
Press Release Is Europe's transport getting greener? Partly
While technological advances produce cleaner vehicles, more and more passengers and goods are travelling further distances, thereby offsetting efficiency gains. Based on analysis of long-term trends, a new European Environment Agency (EEA) report calls for a clear vision defining Europe's transport system by 2050 and consistent policies to achieve it.
Located in Media News
Press Release Recession and renewables cut greenhouse emissions in 2009
Greenhouse gas emissions decreased very sharply in 2009, by 7.1 % in the EU-27 and 6.9 % in the EU-15. These most recent results, compiled by the European Environment Agency (EEA), confirm estimates made by the EEA last year. This decrease was largely the result of the economic recession of 2009, but also sustained strong growth in renewable energy.
Located in Media News
Press Release D source code EU greenhouse gas emissions estimated to increase in 2010, but long-term decrease expected to continue
The European Union remains well on track to achieve its Kyoto Protocol target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions despite a 2.4 % emissions increase in 2010, according to first estimates by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The 2010 increase follows a 7 % drop in 2009, largely due to the economic recession and growth of renewable energy generation.
Located in Media News
Press Release European transport sector must be ambitious to meet targets
Emissions of many pollutants from transport fell in 2009. But this reduction may only be a temporary effect of the economic downturn, according to the latest annual report on transport emissions from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism (TERM) explores the environmental impact of transport. For the first time, the report considers a comprehensive set of quantitative targets proposed by the European Commission’s 2011 roadmap on transport.
Located in Media News
Press Release Higher EU greenhouse gas emissions in 2010 due to economic recovery and cold winter
Greenhouse gas emissions increased in 2010, as a result of both economic recovery in many countries after the 2009 recession and a colder winter. Nonetheless, emissions growth was somewhat contained by continued strong growth in renewable energy sources. These figures from the greenhouse gas inventory published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) today confirm earlier EEA estimates.
Located in Media News
Press Release object code Traffic pollution still harmful to health in many parts of Europe
Transport in Europe is responsible for damaging levels of air pollutants and a quarter of EU greenhouse gas emissions. Many of the resulting environmental problems can be addressed by stepping up efforts to meet new EU targets, according to the latest report from the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in Media News
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100