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File How does the emission trading scheme work?
Emission trading scheme? Cap and trade? What do these words mean? And how does it all contribute to reduced emissions of greenhouse gases? This animation shows how the scheme works.
Located in Media Audiovisuals
Publication Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections in Europe 2009
Located in Publications
Publication Annual European Community greenhouse gas inventory 1990–2007 and inventory report 2009
The present inventory also constitutes the EU‑15 voluntary submission under the Kyoto Protocol.
Located in Publications
Publication Application of the Emissions Trading Directive by EU Member States — reporting year 2008
According to Article 21 of the Emissions Trading Directive, Member States shall report annually on its application. The reporting obligation allows the Commission to continuously follow the implementation of the Directive and provides information for the Commission's review report under Article 30 of the Directive. By late October 2008, Article 21 reports had been received from all Member States. The responses in those reports were assessed by the EEA and its European Topic Centre on Air and Climate Change (ETC/ACC) and compiled into this report.
Located in Publications
Publication Energy and environment report 2008
Located in Publications
Publication Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections in Europe 2008
Located in Publications
File Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon
The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
Publication Application of the Emissions Trading Directive by EU Member States - reporting year 2007
Located in Publications
File chemical/x-pdb 50 years of protecting Europe's environment
Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.
Located in Environmental topics Policy instruments Multimedia
File Reducing climate impacts from international aviation: Europe leads the way
The European Commission is proposing legislation to bring the aviation sector into the European Union's pioneering emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) in order to control the rapid growth in CO2 emissions from air travel. Until now airlines have not been subject to the constraints on energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions that other businesses have to live with. Emissions from domestic flights are covered by the Kyoto Protocol's emission targets for developed countries, but international aviation - which makes up the vast majority of flights - is not. In addition, jet fuel for international flights has historically been exempted from taxation. Hence the need for policy action.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100