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File Better and cleaner urban transport for Europe
Urban traffic is responsible for 40% of CO2 road transport emissions. In Europe, 9 citizens out of 10 are exposed to harmful particle emissions that are higher than the tolerated norm. Time wasted in traffic jams will soon cost 1% of the European Union’s GDP. In terms of urban transport, the European Union contributes to financing infrastructures and equipment, but also supports projects aiming at replacing petrol by alternative and clean fuels. Most cities in the EU are putting in place a mix of advanced technologies and transport policy measures, such as alternative traffic management systems to combine mobility and quality of life. The EU cooperates with cities, notably through the CIVITAS network, to favour the exchange of know-how and best practices at European level.
Located in Environmental topics Transport Multimedia
File Clean air for Europe
Air pollution is a growing concern in the area of public health. Scientific research shows that air pollutants are behind a higher number of diseases such as respiratory allergies, asthma and inflammatory conditions. It is the most vulnerable segments of populations, the elderly and children, who are the first to be affected by this phenomenon. In May 2001, the European Commission launched its " Clean Air for Europe " (CAFE) programme. This is a three-year programme intended to investigate all sources of air pollution and provide solutions to reduce them.
Located in Environmental topics Air pollution Multimedia
Publication Explaining road transport emissions - A non-technical guide
Road transport is an important source of both greenhouse gases and air pollutants. Despite improvements in vehicle efficiencies over past decades, today the sector is responsible for almost one fifth of Europe's greenhouse gas emissions. Emissions from vehicles also lead to high concentrations of air pollutants above EU standards in many of Europe's cities. This report provides a summary of the current knowledge on vehicle emissions in Europe. It also explains how emissions are monitored and the common technologies used to limit them.
Located in Publications
Figure Road transport's market share increases strongly in EU-12
Graph showing the percentage split between road and rail freight for EU-12, EU-15 and EU-27
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight Van manufacturers must make new models more efficient by 2020
New vans in the European Union (EU) must become more efficient to meet carbon dioxide targets in 2017 and 2020, according to provisional data published by the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in News
Highlight Has policy improved Europe's air quality?
In recent decades, the EU has introduced a range of policies to improve air quality by controlling pollutant emissions. A new report by the European Environment Agency (EEA) evaluates three key instruments and finds that they have significantly improved Europe's air quality and reduced pollution-induced health effects. There is scope for even more progress, however, if countries achieve all their binding commitments to reduce emissions.
Located in News
Highlight Eleven Member States exceed air emissions limits under LRTAP Convention
Emissions of most air pollutants have fallen over the last two decades in Europe. But many Member States have exceeded internationally-agreed pollutant limits set to protect human health and the environment, according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). Road transport, households, power plants, agricultural activities and certain industry sectors continue to emit significant amounts of air pollution.
Located in News
Data Visualization Development of specific CO2 emissions from road passenger and freight transport in Europe
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Article Troff document Climate change "mitigation impossible" without transport
As the source of substantial and rapidly growing greenhouse gas emissions, transport must clearly be part of a global agreement to mitigate climate change.
Located in Articles
Article Reducing speed limits on motorways: how good is it for the environment?
Lower speed limits on motorways are generally associated with road safety. But several European countries are now debating whether they also benefit the environment and, if so, how much. There is no simple way of measuring the environmental benefits of lower speed limits but several factors clearly play a key role.
Located in Articles
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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