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Figure Distribution of chemical status of groundwater, rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal waters.
Number of Member States contributing to the dataset: Groundwater (26); Rivers (25); Lakes (22); Transitional (15) and Coastal (20). Percentages shown for rivers, lakes, transitional and coastal are by water body count. Groundwater percentages, however, are expressed by area. The total number of water bodies is shown in parenthesis. Data from Sweden are excluded from surface water data illustrated in the figure. This is because Sweden contributed a disproportionately large amount of data and, classified all its surface waters as poor status since levels of mercury found within biota in both fresh and coastal waters exceed quality standards.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Proportion of classified water bodies in different RBDs affected by pollution pressures, for rivers and lakes (left panel) and for coastal and transitional waters (right panel)
The percentage is based on total number of classified water bodies. See the indicator specification for more details.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Conservation status of river and lake habitat types and species, and conservation status of coastal and transitional waters habitat types of European interest
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Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Proportion of classified surface water bodies in different RBDs holding less than good ecological status or potential, for rivers and lakes (left panel) and for coastal and transitional waters (right panel)
The figure shows percentage of the total number of classified water bodies. See the indicator specification for more details.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data Waterbase - Rivers
Waterbase is the generic name given to the EEA's databases on the status and quality of Europe's rivers, lakes, groundwater bodies and transitional, coastal and marine waters, and on the quantity of Europe's water resources
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Figure Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5) and total ammonium concentrations in rivers between 1992 and 2011
Concentrations are expressed as annual mean concentrations. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). The number of river monitoring stations included per country is given in metadata (see downloads and more info). BOD7 data has been recalculated into BOD5 data. If data on total ammonium are not available, data on ammonium are included into the data series.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure BOD5 concentrations in rivers between 1992 and 2011 draining to different sea regions of Europe
The sea region data series are calculated as the average of annual mean data from river monitoring stations in each sea region. The data thus represents rivers or river basins draining into that particular sea. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). The number of river monitoring stations included per sea region is given in parentheses. There were no stations with consistent data series on BOD7 in rivers draining to the Arctic Ocean. BOD7 data has been recalculated into BOD5 data.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Oxygen consuming substances in rivers (CSI 019) - Assessment published Dec 2010
Concentrations of BOD and total ammonium have decreased in European rivers in the period 1992 to 2009 (Fig. 1), mainly due to general improvement in wastewater treatment. See also WISE interactive maps:   Mean annual BOD in rivers and Mean annual Total Ammonium in rivers
Located in Data and maps Indicators Oxygen consuming substances in rivers
File chemical/x-pdb 50 years of protecting Europe's environment
Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.
Located in Environmental topics Policy instruments Multimedia
Indicator Assessment Oxygen consuming substances in rivers (CSI 019) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2012
Concentrations of BOD and total ammonium have decreased in European rivers in the period 1992 to 2009 (Fig. 1), mainly due to general improvement in wastewater treatment. See also WISE interactive maps:   Mean annual BOD in rivers and Mean annual Total Ammonium in rivers
Located in Data and maps Indicators Oxygen consuming substances in rivers
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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