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Article Forests, health and climate change
Forests are essential to our survival and well-being. Forests clean our air, our water, our soil and they regulate our climate, amongst many other things. Trees and forests are not always associated with urban landscapes. However, there too they provide invaluable, often invisible, services. Simply by acting as 'green oasis' in our concrete jungles, they offer recreation and health services for many European citizens.
Located in Articles
Figure Share of Renewable Energy to Final Energy Consumption with normalised hydro and wind in EEA countries
Share of Renewable Energy to Final Energy Consumption with normalised for hydro, EU27. In 2009 the European Commission adopted a new directive on renewable energy (2009/28/EC). The new Directive on renewable energy sets an ambitious target for the EU-27 of 20% share of energy from renewable sources in final energy consumption by 2020 and a 10% share of renewable energy in the transport sector (in each Member State).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Highlight chemical/x-isostar Major new website to assist with climate change adaptation in Europe
Climate change is already evident in Europe. Across the continent, policy makers are starting to respond to current and future impacts and risks associated with rising temperatures, changing precipitation, melting glaciers, ice and snow, rising sea levels, and more frequent and intense floods and droughts.
Located in News
Folder Photos
Located in The Environmental Atlas Environmental Atlas of Europe City of five seas
Daviz Visualization Trend in yearly cumulated melting area of the Greenland ice sheet
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Figure Contribution of the different GHGs to the overall greenhouse gas concentration in 1950, 1990 and 2010
Contribution of the different GHGs as included in the Kyoto and Montreal protocol to the overall greenhouse gas concentration in 1950, 1990 and 2010.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Publication Consumption and the environment — 2012 update
Update to the European Environment State and Outlook 2010 (SOER 2010) thematic assessment
Located in Publications
Figure Maximum ozone hole area in 2011
False-color view of total ozone over the Antarctic pole. The purple and blue colors are where there is the least ozone, and the yellows and reds are where there is more ozone. Measured in 12 September 2011.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Change in global average temperature from three sources (1850–2011)
Left figure: Global average air temperature anomalies (1850 to 2011) in degrees Celsius (°C) relative to a pre-industrial baseline period for 3 analyses of observations: 1) Black line - HadCRUT3 from the UK Met Office Hadley Centre and University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit, baseline period 1850-1899 (Brohan et al., 2006) with the grey area representing the 95% confidence range, 2) Red line – MLOST from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Centre, baseline period 1880-1899 (Smith et al., 2008), and 3) Blue line - GISSTemp from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Institute for Space Studies, baseline period 1880-1899 (Hansen et al., 2010). Upper graph shows annual anomalies and lower graph shows decadal average anomalies for the same datasets. Right figure: Rates of change of global average temperature (1850 to 2011) in ºC per decade, based on 10-year running average of the 3 datasets: 1) Black line - HadCRUT3 from the UK Met Office Hadley Centre and University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit, baseline period 1850-1899 (Brohan et al., 2006), 2) Red line – MLOST from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Centre, baseline period 1880-1899 (Smith et al., 2008), and 3) Blue line - GISSTemp from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Institute for Space Studies, baseline period 1880-1899 (Hansen et al., 2010).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Projected changes in annual near-surface temperature for periods 2021–2050 and 2071–2100
Projected changes in annual near-surface air temperature (°C) using multi-model ensemble average of RCM simulations for the period 2021-2050 (left) and 2071-2100 (right). Model simulations of the EU-ENSEMBLES project using the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario for the periods 1961-1990, 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 (van der Linden and Mitchell, 2009).
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100