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Figure Particulate matter (PM10) - Annual limit value for the protection of human health
In the air quality directive (2008/EC/50), the EU has set two limit values for particulate matter (PM10) for the protection of human health: the PM10 daily mean value may not exceed 50 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) more than 35 times in a year and the PM10 annual mean value may not exceed 40 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3). In some areas time extensions have been granted by DG Environment for meeting these limit values. Information about time extensions is provided by DG Environment at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/air/quality/legislation/time_extensions.htm
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Press Release RealAudio broadcast Air pollution still harming health across Europe
Around 90 % of city dwellers in the European Union (EU) are exposed to one of the most damaging air pollutants at levels deemed harmful to health by the World Health Organisation (WHO). This result comes from the latest assessment of air quality in Europe, published by the European Environment Agency (EEA).
Located in Media News
Publication Air pollution — SOER 2010 thematic assessment
Emissions of air pollutants derive from almost all economic and societal activities. They result in clear risks to human health and ecosystems. In Europe, policies and actions at all levels have greatly reduced anthropogenic emissions and exposure but some air pollutants still harm human health. Similarly, as emissions of acidifying pollutants have reduced, the situation for Europe's rivers and lakes has improved but atmospheric nitrogen oversupply still threatens biodiversity in sensitive terrestrial and water ecosystems. The movement of atmospheric pollution between continents attracts increasing political attention. Greater international cooperation, also focusing on links between climate and air pollution policies, is required more than ever to address air pollution.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Thematic assessments
Common environmental theme D source code Air pollution - State and impacts (Finland)
Air pollution - State and Impacts
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Country assessments Finland
Common environmental theme D source code Air pollution - Outlook 2020 (Finland)
Air Pollution - Outlook
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Country assessments Finland
Figure C source code header Trends in PM10 (top graph, 2002–2011) and PM2.5 (bottom graph, 2006–2011) annual concentrations (in μg/m3) per station type
The graphs are based on annual mean concentration trends for PM10 (top) and PM2.5 (bottom); they present the range of concentration changes per year (in μg/m3) per station type (urban, traffic, rural and other — mostly industrial). The trends are calculated based on the officially reported data by the EU Member States with a minimum data coverage of 75 % of valid data per year, for at least 8 out of the 10 years period for PM10 and for at least 5 out of the 6 years period for PM2.5. In 2006, France introduced a nation-wide system to correct PM10 measurements. French PM10 data prior to 2007 have been corrected here using station-type dependent factors (de Leeuw and Fiala, 2009). The diagram indicates the lowest and highest trends, the means and the lower and upper quartiles, per station type. The lower quartile splits the lowest 25 % of the data and the upper quartile splits the highest 25 % of the data.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Map of PM10 concentrations in WCE and SEE, 2003, showing the 36th highest daily values at urban background sites superimposed on rural concentrations. Maps constructed from measurements and model calculations (EEA-ETC/ACC Technical Paper 2005/2008)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Rotterdam region — contributions to NO2 and PM10 concentration from different sources, 2000
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Distance-to-target graphs for daily limit value of PM10 (top) and for annual target value of PM2.5 (bottom), 2010
The graphs show the percentage frequency distribution of stations (on y-the axis) in the EU Member States versus the various concentration classes (on the x-axis, in µg/m3). Vertical lines correspond to target or limit values set by the EU legislation.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Annual changes in concentrations of PM10, O3 and NO2 in the period 2001–2010
Statistically significant trends (level of significance 0.1) are calculated by applying the Mann-Kendall test. The trend slopes are indicated with coloured dots when statistically significant. Red dots indicate increasing concentrations. The applied method is described in de Leeuw, 2012
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Phone: +45 3336 7100