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Figure Change in winter orthophosphate concentrations in coastal and open waters of the North East Atlantic, Baltic, Mediterranean and North Seas
The figure shows change in winter orthophosphate concentrations in coastal and open waters of the North East Atlantic, Baltic, Mediterranean and North Seas, 1985-2008
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters (CSI 021) - Assessment published Mar 2013
In 2010, the highest concentrations of oxidized nitrogen were found in the Baltic Sea, in the Gulf of Riga and Kiel Bay, and in Belgian, Dutch and German coastal waters in the Greater North Sea. Reported stations in the Northern Spanish and Croatian coastal waters also showed high concentration levels. The highest orthophosphate concentrations were found in the Baltic Sea, in the Gulf of Riga and Kiel Bay, and in Irish, Belgian, Dutch and German coastal waters in the Greater North Sea. Coastal stations along Northern Spain and Southern France also showed high concentration levels. Between 1985 and 2010, overall nutrient concentrations have been either stable or decreasing in stations reported to the EEA in the Greater North Sea, Celtic Seas and in the Baltic Sea. However, this decrease has been more pronounced for nitrogen. Assessments for the overall Mediterranean and Black Sea regions were not possible, data only being available for stations in France and Croatia.  For oxidized nitrogen concentrations, 14% of all the reported stations showed decreasing trends, whereas only 2% showed increasing trends. Decreases were most evident in the Baltic Sea (coastal waters of Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Finland, and open waters) and in southern part of the coast of the Greater North Sea. Increasing trends were mainly found in Croatian coastal stations.  For orthophosphate concentrations, 10% of all the reported stations showed a decrease. This was most evident in coastal and open water stations in the Greater North Sea, and in coastal stations in the Baltic Sea. Increasing orthophosphate trends, observed in 6% of the reported stations, were mainly detected in Irish, Danish and Finnish coastal waters (Gulf of Finland and Gulf of Bothnia) and in open waters of the Baltic Proper.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters
Article Marine — biodiversity under pressure
Located in Signals — well-being and the environment Signals 2010
Figure Troff document Conservation status of marine habitat types and species listed in Annex I of the EU Habitats Directive
Conservation status of marine habitat types and species listed in Annex I of the EU Habitats Directive
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Data EEA reference grid
The grid is based on the recommendation at the 1st European Workshop on Reference Grids in 2003 and later INSPIRE geographical grid systems. For each country three vector polygon grid shape files, 1, 10 and 100 km, are available. The grids cover at least country borders - plus 15km buffer - and, where applicable, marine Exclusive Economic Zones v7.0 - plus 15km buffer - (www.vliz.be/vmdcdata/marbound). Note that the extent of the grid into the marine area does not reflect the extent of the territorial waters.
Located in Data and maps Datasets
Highlight Ten things everyone should know about Europe's productive seas
A recent assessment by the European Environment Agency (EEA) showed that European seas are in a worrying state. As policy makers meet to discuss the marine environment that sustains maritime development, the EEA summarises ten important facts about the ecosystems beneath the waves.
Located in News
SOER Message Marine and coastal environment — key message 2
Nutrient enrichment is a major problem in the coastal and marine environment, where it accelerates the growth of phytoplankton and can lead to oxygen depletion. Concentrations of some heavy metals and persistent organic contaminants in marine biota exceed food stuff limits in all Europe’s seas.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Marine and coastal environment — key message 1
Degradation of marine and coastal ecosystems is observed in the Black, Mediterranean, Baltic, North East Atlantic Seas and in the Arctic. This trend is caused by fishing, agriculture, the industrial use of chemicals, tourist development, shipping, energy exploitation and other maritime activities. Projected climate change is likely to increase the impact of these activities in all seas, and in the Arctic
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Message Marine and coastal environment — key message 7
Growth of the maritime, agriculture and tourism sectors is expected to continue. An important future objective for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive will be to ensure that this growth is sustainable to achieve and then maintain ‘Good Environmental Status’ of the marine environment. Moreover, it will be necessary to implement planning principles in line with the approaches of Integrated Coastal Zone Management and Maritime Spatial Planning.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key messages
SOER Key fact Marine and coastal environment - key fact 3
Where marine species and habitat types have been assessed, the majority are found to be in unfavourable or unknown condition; only 10 % of habitats and 2 % of species are found in good condition.
Located in The European environment – state and outlook 2010 Marine and coastal environment — SOER 2010 thematic assessment Key facts
European Environment Agency (EEA)
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Phone: +45 3336 7100