Personal tools

Notifications
Get notifications on new reports and products. Frequency: 3-4 emails / month.
Subscriptions
Sign up to receive our reports (print and/or electronic) and quarterly e-newsletter.
Follow us
Twitter icon Twitter
Facebook icon Facebook
YouTube icon YouTube channel
RSS logo RSS Feeds
More

Write to us Write to us

For the public:


For media and journalists:

Contact EEA staff
Contact the web team
FAQ

Call us Call us

Reception:

Phone: (+45) 33 36 71 00
Fax: (+45) 33 36 71 99


next
previous
items

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sound and independent information
on the environment

50 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type





















































































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Figure Decoupling of nutrients emission in water from gross value added in food industry in Europe between 2004 and 2009
The chart displays changes in emission of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from food industry in water (expressed in kg of nutrients (P) equivalents) , and in production of food industry (expressed as the gross value added GVA, in millions Euro) in Europe between 2004 and 2009. See Methodology section for more details.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Reference Waterbase - Monitoring stations for rivers and lakes
Water quality monitoring stations in rivers and lakes
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Map of winter oxidized nitrogen concentrations observed in 2005
The low category refers to values within the lowest 20th percentile and the high category refers to values within the upper 20th percentile of concentrations in a regional sea
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Nutrients emission intensity of food industry in Europe between 2004 and 2009
The chart displays changes in nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) emission intensity of food industry between 2004 and 2009. Nutrient emission intensity is expressed as kilogram of nutrients equivalent (P) discharged in water per unit of production of food industry (expressed as one million Euro gross value added). See Methodology section for more details.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure D source code Average concentrations of nutrients in European groundwaters and surface waters (1992-2009) Fig. 1a: Nitrate in groundwater; Fig. 1b Nitrate in rivers; Fig. 1c Orthophosphate in rivers; and Fig. 1d: Total phosphorus in lakes
Concentrations are expressed as annual mean concentrations. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included (see indicator specification). The number of groundwater bodies/river stations/lake stations included per country is given in metadata (see downloads and more info). Fig 1a: Nitrate concentration in European groundwater 1992-2009 Fig 1b: Nitrate concentration in European rivers 1992-2009 Fig 1c: Orthophosphate concentration in European rivers 1992-2009 Fig 1d: Total phosphorus concentration in European lakes 1992-2009
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Indicator Assessment Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters (CSI 021) - Assessment published Jul 2011
Decreasing nutrient concentrations were found in the North Sea and in the Baltic Sea. In the Mediterranean and Black Sea, the lack of temporally and spatially comprehensive time series does not allow an overall assessment. In 2008, the highest concentrations of oxidized nitrogen were found in the Gulf of Riga, and in Lithuanian, Swedish, German, Belgian, and Scottish coastal waters. Between 1985 and 2008, 12% of all the stations in the European seas reported to the EEA showed decreasing trends of oxidized nitrogen concentrations. These trends were more evident in the open Baltic Sea and in the Dutch and German coastal waters in the North Sea. In 2008, the highest orthophosphate concentrations were found at Finnish coastal stations in the Gulf of Finland, the Gulf of Riga, German, Belgian, French, and Scottish coastal waters. Between 1985 and 2008, 15% of all the stations in the European seas reported to the EEA showed a decrease in orthophosphate concentrations, mainly because of improved waste water treatment. This decrease was most evident in Norwegian, Lithuanian, Danish, Belgian and Dutch coastal water stations, and in the open waters of the North and Baltic Seas.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Nutrients in transitional, coastal and marine waters
File Sources of water pollution
(Transcription of audio on video) Water can be polluted from many sources. Faecal contamination from sewage makes water unpleasant and unsafe for recreational activities such as swimming, boating or fishing. Many organic pollutants, including sewage effluent and farm and food-processing wastes consume oxygen, suffocating fish and other aquatic life. Nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates, from everything from farm fertilisers to household detergents, can 'overfertilise' the water causing the growth of large mats of algae, some of which are directly toxic. When the algae die, they sink to the water bottom, decomposing, consuming oxygen and damaging ecosystems. Chemical contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and some industrial chemicals can threaten wildlife and human health. Sediment run-off from the land can make water muddy, blocking sunlight and, as a result, killing wildlife. And irrigation, especially when used improperly, can bring flows of salts, nutrients and other pollutants from soils into water. Source: SOER 2005
Located in Environmental topics Biodiversity Multimedia
Indicator Assessment Nutrients in freshwater (CSI 020) - Assessment DRAFT created Apr 2012
•    Average nitrate concentrations in European groundwaters increased from 1992 to 1998, but have declined again since 2004. •    The average nitrate concentration in European rivers decreased by approximately 13% between 1992 and 2009 (from 2.5 to 2.1 mg/l N), reflecting the effect of measures to reduce agricultural inputs of nitrate. •    Average orthophosphate concentrations in European rivers have decreased markedly over the last two decades, being halved between 1992 and 2009 (52% decrease). Also average lake phosphorus concentration decreased over the period 1992-2009 (by 22%), the major part of the decrease occurring in the first half of the period. The decrease in phosphorus concentrations reflects both improvement in wastewater treatment and reduction in phosphorus in detergents. •    Overall, reductions in the levels of freshwater nutrients over the last two decades primarily reflect improvements in wastewater treatment. Emissions from agriculture continue to be a significant source.
Located in Data and maps Indicators Nutrients in freshwater
Data Visualisation Decoupling of heavy metals emission in water from gross value added in metal industry
Located in Data and maps Visualise your data
Data Visualisation Heavy metals emission intensity of metal industry
Located in Data and maps Visualise your data
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100