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Figure Percentage of built-up area in the first km of the coast by province in Spain (1990 and 2000)
by NUTS3
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Observed coastal lindane deposition, 2003
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Increase of area occupied by diffuse residential sprawl in the 10 km coastal zone (1990-2000)
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Coastal zone
Degree of urbanisation, risk zones of oil spills and polluted water bodies in coastal zones
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Reference Waterbase - Monitoring stations for rivers and lakes
Water quality monitoring stations in rivers and lakes
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
Figure Chlorophyll-a concentrations in European seas in 2010
The map shows Chlorophyll-a concentrations in European coastal and open seas in 2010. The class boundaries “high”, “moderate” and “low” concentration are determined by the 80/20 percentiles of the data set in each sea (sub)region. The low category refers to values within the lowest 20th percentile and the high category refers to values within the upper 20th percentile of concentrations.
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File The fourth assessment: Presentation of the report at the Belgrade conference
Subtitled movie of the speech hold by Executive Director of the EEA Jacqueline McGlade during the presentation of the 4th pan-European assessment at the UNECE 6th Мinisterial Conference "Environment for Europe", in Belgrade, 10th of October 2007.
Located in Environmental topics Archive: the Belgrade ministerial conference Videos and interviews
Indicator Assessment Chlorophyll in transitional, coastal and marine waters (CSI 023) - Assessment published Jul 2011
In 2008, the highest summer chlorophyll-a concentrations were observed in coastal areas and estuaries where nutrient concentrations are high, namely in the Gulf of Riga, the Gulf of Finland and along the coast of France and Belgium. Although nutrient concentrations in some European sea areas decreased from 1985 to 2008 (see Core Set Indicator 21), these changes were not clearly reflected in chlorophyll-a concentrations: of the 546 stations reported to the EEA the majority of the stations (89%) indicated no statistically significant change. Changes were detected mainly in Finnish, Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish and Italian coastal waters. At the Finnish and Swedish monitoring stations chlorophyll-a concentrations showed both decreasing and increasing trends, whereas in Italy, Netherlands and Norway concentrations were mainly decreasing. An analysis of changes based on satellite imagery show significantly increasing trends of ocean colour (equivalent to chl-a)along the Mediterranean coast, whereas trends are significantly decreasing in large parts of the central Mediterranean and Black Seas. It also shows significantly increasing trends in the Baltic Sea, but here the analysis is less certain.  
Located in Data and maps Indicators Chlorophyll in transitional, coastal and marine waters
Figure Chlorophyll-a concentrations in European seas, 2008
Chlorophyll-a concentrations in European seas in 2008 based on observations
Located in Data and maps Maps and graphs
File chemical/x-pdb 50 years of protecting Europe's environment
Today the European Union has the most environmentally friendly arsenal of rules in the world and has done more to tackle pressing ecological problems, such as climate change, than any other major power. But it has not always been like this. Caring for the environment did not feature in the Treaty of Rome, the document that gave birth to the modern day EU. Yet environmental problems were never far away. Europe’s love affair with the car was moving into top gear, industry was busy belching out pollutants and raw sewage was being pumped into our rivers and seas.
Located in Environmental topics Policy instruments Multimedia
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