Personal tools

next
previous
items

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sound and independent information
on the environment

70 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type























































































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Publication Monitoring CO2 emissions from new passenger cars in the EU: summary of data for 2012
The EEA has collected EU Member States' data on passenger car registrations, in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 443/2009. All Member States reported information on Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and the mass of cars, together with other vehicle characteristics. This data was used to evaluate the performance in 2012 of the new vehicle fleet, and its progress toward meeting the CO2 emissions target of 130 grams of CO2 per kilometre (gCO2/km) by 2015. The current dataset is provisional, and will now be sent for verification to all car manufacturers responsible for cars registered in the EU in 2012.
Located in Publications
Highlight All larger carmakers met CO2 targets in 2012
All the main carmakers have met their 2012 targets for vehicles' average carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, according to the European Environment Agency (EEA). However, most will need to sell increasingly efficient vehicles to meet targets in 2015 and beyond.
Located in News
Publication European Union CO2 emissions: different accounting perspectives
The aim of this technical report is to explain to a wider audience the concepts and methodologies behind different air emission accounting perspectives and the resulting emissions data at the EU level. In brief, there are three of these different accounting perspectives: territorial, production and consumption.
Located in Publications
SOER Key fact chemical/x-pdb New cars more CO2 efficient
There were 12.8 million new vehicles registered in the EU in 2011. The average CO2 emissions for these cars was 135.7 grams CO2 per kilometre, which is 4.6g CO2/km less than in 2010 – a reduction of 3.3 %.
Located in News New cars sold in 2011 were 3.3 % more fuel efficient than those sold in 2010 Key facts
Daviz Visualization Specific CO2 emissions per tonne-km and per mode of transport in Europe
Located in Data and maps Data visualisations
Highlight Big potential of cutting greenhouse gases from waste
There is a big potential to cut greenhouse gases (GHGs) from municipal solid waste management, according to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report, 'Waste opportunities – Past and future climate benefits from better municipal waste management in Europe', covers the EU-27 (excluding Cyprus), Norway and Switzerland. It estimates that these countries could make GHG savings of up to 78 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) by 2020, or 1.53 % of Europe's emissions in 2008.
Located in News
File Europe leads the fight against climate change
The Earth is rapidly getting warmer, threatening serious and even catastrophic disruption to our societies and to the natural environment on which we depend. Over the course of the 20th century the average temperature increased by around 0.6 C globally, by almost 1 C in Europe and by no less than 5 C in the Arctic. This man-made warming is already having many disruptive effects around the globe. Sea levels are rising as a result of melting glaciers and ice sheets, threatening to flood low-lying communities. Extreme weather conditions; floods, droughts, storms are becoming more severe, more frequent and more costly in some parts of the world. And many endangered species may be pushed to extinction over the coming decades as climate change affects their traditional habitats.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Emissions trading - putting a price on carbon
The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) is a world first and a major weapon in Europe's fight against climate change. The innovative system has turned carbon dioxide emissions into a tradeable commodity. They can now be bought and sold like any other of the thousands of products traded on world markets today. The scheme works by placing a limit or a 'cap' on the amount of carbon dioxide participating installations - currently around 10,500 across the European Union - can emit every year. If an installation emits more than its allowance, it must either pay a very hefty fine or buy surplus allowances from companies that have managed to stay below their limit. The system ensures that overall CO2 emissions from the plants covered are cut in the most cost effective way.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Reducing climate impacts from international aviation: Europe leads the way
The European Commission is proposing legislation to bring the aviation sector into the European Union's pioneering emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) in order to control the rapid growth in CO2 emissions from air travel. Until now airlines have not been subject to the constraints on energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions that other businesses have to live with. Emissions from domestic flights are covered by the Kyoto Protocol's emission targets for developed countries, but international aviation - which makes up the vast majority of flights - is not. In addition, jet fuel for international flights has historically been exempted from taxation. Hence the need for policy action.
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
File Emissions trading
(This video has audio) An explanation of emissions trading. Source: EU Emissions Trading - An Open Scheme Promoting Global Innovation to Combat Climate Change (Nov. 2004), by the EU Publications Office
Located in Environmental topics Climate change Multimedia
European Environment Agency (EEA)
Kongens Nytorv 6
1050 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Phone: +45 3336 7100